Advertisement

Wisconsin sees huge increase in COVID-19 testing, big drop in percentage of positive cases

(NBC15)
Published: May. 7, 2020 at 1:59 PM CDT
Email this link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

Wisconsin saw a huge increase in the number of coronavirus test results on Wednesday, shattering the previous record for a second day in a row. Unfortunately, the state also saw 12 more COVID-19 deaths and a sharp increase in the number of hospitalizations.

According to the Department of Health Services data released Thursday afternoon, there are now 9,215 confirmed coronavirus cases in Wisconsin. That's an increase of 314, which is on the low end of increases in the past week.

That represents 5.69% of the record 5,523 test results. We had to look back to March 24 to find a lower percentage. The percent of positive results has declined for 4 days in a row, which hasn't happened since the state's first COVID-19 diagnosis on February 5 according to our records.

Wisconsin reported 12 COVID-19 patient deaths in the past 24 hours, bringing the state's death toll to 374.

The state saw a large increase in the number of COVID-19 patients who are currently hospitalized, up to 405. That's 106 more hospitalizations than were reported Wednesday. More than 100 are in intensive care, and more than 300 are on ventilators.

Hospitalized during treatment: 1,732

Currently hospitalized: 405

In intensive care: 108

The state's supply of mechanical ventilators is strong, with 314 in use out of almost 1,300 available.

Cases county-by-county

Counties with additional cases and/or deaths are indicated in

boldface

.

Twenty-seven Wisconsin counties and three counties in Michigan's Upper Peninsula reported more confirmed coronavirus cases since Wednesday.

Wisconsin

Adams - 4 cases (1 death)

Ashland - 2 cases

Barron - 7 cases

Bayfield - 3 cases (1 death)

Brown - 1,706 cases

(+53)

(12 deaths)

(+1)

Buffalo - 5 cases (1 death)

Burnett - 0 cases

Calumet - 22 cases

(+2)

Chippewa - 27 cases

Clark - 23 cases

(+2) (4 deaths)

Columbia - 32 cases (1 death)

Crawford - 16 cases

(+9)

Dane - 447 cases

(+2) (22 deaths)

Dodge - 46 cases

(+4) (1 death)

Door - 18 cases (3 deaths)

Douglas - 10 cases

Dunn - 14 cases

(+1)

Eau Claire - 47 cases

(+2)

Florence - 2 case

Fond du Lac - 84 cases

(+1) (3 deaths)

Forest - 1 case

Grant - 66 cases

(+6) (7 deaths)

Green - 21 cases

(+1)

Green Lake - 5 cases

Iowa - 10 cases

Iron - 2 cases (1 death)

Jackson - 12 cases (1 death)

Jefferson - 50 cases

(+3)

Juneau – 20 cases

(+1) (1 death)

Kenosha - 610 cases

(+30) (14 deaths)

Kewaunee - 25 cases (1 death)

La Crosse - 32 cases

Lafayette - 9 cases

(+1)

Langlade - 0 cases

Lincoln - 1 case

Manitowoc - 17 cases (1 death)

Marathon - 21 cases (1 death)

Marinette - 13 cases (1 death)

Marquette - 3 cases (1 death)

Menominee - 2 cases

(+1)

Milwaukee – 3,373 cases

(+20)

(212 deaths)

(+8)

Monroe - 14 cases (1 death)

Oconto - 26 cases

(+3)

Oneida - 6 cases

Outagamie - 83 cases

(+10) (2 deaths)

Ozaukee - 99 cases

(+4) (9 deaths)

Pepin - 0 cases

Pierce - 12 cases

(+1)

Polk - 5 cases

Portage - 7 cases

Price - 1 case

Racine - 590 cases

(+31)

(16 deaths)

(+1)

Richland - 13 cases (2 deaths)

Rock - 324 cases

(+13)

(12 deaths)

(+2)

Rusk - 4 cases

Sauk - 69 cases (3 deaths)

Sawyer - 4 cases

Shawano - 17 cases

Sheboygan - 65 cases

(+6) (2 deaths)

St. Croix - 23 cases

Taylor - 0 cases

Trempealeau - 5 cases

Vernon - 2 cases

Vilas - 4 cases

Walworth - 224 cases

(+9) (9 deaths)

Washburn - 1 case

Washington - 113 cases

(+6) (4 deaths)

Waukesha - 380 cases

(+6) (22 deaths)

Waupaca - 10 cases (1 death)

Waushara - 4 cases

Winnebago - 88 cases

(+3) (1 death)

Wood - 2 cases

Michigan's Upper Peninsula

Alger - 0 cases

Baraga - 1 case

Chippewa - 2 case

Delta - 15 cases

(+1) (2 deaths)

Dickinson - 4 cases (2 deaths)

Gogebic - 4 cases (1 death)

Houghton - 2 cases

Iron - 0 cases

Keweenaw - 0 cases

Luce - 1 case

Mackinac - 6 cases

Marquette - 53 cases

(+2) (8 deaths)

Menominee - 6 cases

Ontonagon - 0 cases

Schoolcraft - 4 cases

(+1)

Public Health Investigations

This week the Wisconsin Department of Health Services reports public health investigations are underway at 235 businesses and group housing, health care and long-term facilities around the state.

The state doesn't identify the facilities or where they're located except by region and general function.

In the Northeastern region, there are 47 investigations underway: 22 at long-term care facilities (compared to 11 a week ago), 20 at workplaces (compared to 8 a week ago), 4 in group housing facilities (down from 7 a week ago), 1 in a health care facility, and none at sites that don't fall into those categories.

The DHS says it takes only one confirmed case at a long-term care facility to trigger an investigation. It takes two or more cases anywhere else.

Examples of a long-term care facility include nursing homes, assisted living and residential care apartment complexes.

Group housing facilities include prisons, jails, homeless shelters, dormitories and group homes.

Health care facilities may include hospitals, clinics, hospice or dialysis centers.

Workplaces include manufacturers, warehouses, offices and other indoor work settings.

Examples of other settings include child care centers, restaurants, event venues and places of worship.

Brown County Executive Troy Streckenbach said during a county health briefing Thursday that DHS plans to break down those numbers by county instead of region starting next week.

Community testing

Waushara County announced four drive-through COVID-19 testing events in the county starting with community testing in Wild Rose next Tuesday, May 12. It's by appointment only. Call the county health department at (920) 787-6590. Anyone experiencing symptoms can also call their health care provider and ask to be tested (

).

Hospital readiness

The Department of Health Services is surveying hospitals to determine whether 95% are able to test every symptomatic staff member with a role of treating patients and that 95% can treat all patients who come in without needing to go into crisis response mode.

However, reports of flu-like symptoms over 14 days and cases of COVID-19 among health care workers over the past week are no longer on the decline.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently announced six more possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Symptoms that require immediate medical attention include:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to rouse
  • Bluish lips or face

The CDC says this is not an all-inclusive list. Consult a medical provider about any symptoms that are severe or concerning.

Prevention

The coronavirus is a new, or "novel," virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.

To help prevent the spread of the virus:

  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible. Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.
  • Clean frequently-touched surfaces and objects daily (e.g., tables, countertops, light switches, doorknobs, and cabinet handles).

Latest News

Latest News