Wisconsin sees another surge in positive cases but percentage remains low

MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) - As Wisconsin, by court order, starts to emerge from the Safer at Home order, the state Department of Health reported another surge in positive coronavirus cases.

The state reported a near-record 373 new patients after a new record 5,860 tests were completed. There were 13 more deaths, including two in Outagamie County and one in Brown County.

That brings the state's total to 11,275 confirmed coronavirus cases and 434 deaths.

The number of new patients is just below the record 375 patients reported May 8. It represents 6.37% of the test results in the past 24 hours. The percentage of positive results has been in the single digits for 11 straight days.

Thirty-one more COVID-19 patients were hospitalized.

Now a total 1,939 patients have been hospitalized at some point during their treatment, or 17%. That's a continuing decline in the percentage of patients being hospitalized and an indication of how many coronavirus carriers are being found in increased testing statewide.

338 COVID-19 patients are currently hospitalized, and 121 of them are in intensive care.

The state considers 53% of coronavirus patients recovered, meaning they survived 30 days after the onset of symptoms or the clearing of symptoms or release from isolation are documented.

Forty-two of Wisconsin's 72 counties reported additional coronavirus patients in the past 24 hours. Recently, we've seen 18 to 26 counties reporting positive results on the same day.

County-by-county cases
Counties reporting an increase in patients or deaths are indicated in bold

Wisconsin
Adams - 4 cases (1 death)
Ashland - 2 cases
Barron - 11 cases
Bayfield - 3 cases (1 death)
Brown - 1,999 cases (+17) (21 deaths) (+1)
Buffalo - 5 cases (1 death)
Burnett - 1 case (+1) (1 death) (+1)
Calumet - 46 cases (+3) (1 death)
Chippewa - 33 cases (+2)
Clark - 25 cases (+1) (4 deaths)
Columbia - 34 cases (1 death)
Crawford - 18 cases (+1)
Dane - 494 cases (+4) (22 deaths)
Dodge - 83 cases (+4) (1 death)
Door - 23 cases (3 deaths)
Douglas - 12 cases (+1)
Dunn - 20 cases (+1)
Eau Claire - 63 cases (+2)
Florence - 2 case
Fond du Lac - 119 cases (+8) (3 deaths)
Forest - 5 cases
Grant - 71 cases (+1) (10 deaths)
Green - 39 cases (+3)
Green Lake - 10 cases
Iowa - 11 cases (+1)
Iron - 2 cases (1 death)
Jackson - 15 cases (+1) (1 death)
Jefferson - 56 cases (+2) (2 deaths)
Juneau – 21 cases (1 death)
Kenosha - 762 cases (+26 (17 deaths)
Kewaunee - 29 cases (1 death)
La Crosse - 37 cases (+3)
Lafayette - 15 cases (+1)
Langlade - 0 cases
Lincoln - 2 cases (+1)
Manitowoc - 20 cases (1 death)
Marathon - 29 cases (+1) (1 death)
Marinette - 21 cases (1 death)
Marquette - 3 cases (1 death)
Menominee - 2 cases
Milwaukee – 4,387 cases (+172) (242 deaths) (+6)
Monroe - 15 cases (1 death)
Oconto - 28 cases
Oneida - 7 cases
Outagamie - 124 cases (+2) (4 deaths) (+2)
Ozaukee - 113 cases (+3) (10 deaths)
Pepin - 1 case (+1)
Pierce - 15 cases (+1)
Polk - 6 cases (+1)
Portage - 7 cases
Price - 1 case
Racine - 833 cases (+48) (17 deaths)
Richland - 13 cases (2 deaths)
Rock - 393 cases (+13) (14 deaths) (+1)
Rusk - 4 cases
Sauk - 74 cases (+1) (3 deaths)
Sawyer - 4 cases
Shawano - 28 cases (+1)
Sheboygan - 67 cases (+1) (3 deaths)
St. Croix - 37 cases (+1)
Taylor - 0 cases
Trempealeau - 7 cases (+1)
Vernon - 7 cases (+1)
Vilas - 4 cases
Walworth - 251 cases (+8) (11 deaths)
Washburn - 1 case
Washington - 125 cases (+3) (4 deaths)
Waukesha - 444 cases (+23) (23 deaths)
Waupaca - 15 cases (+1) (1 death)
Waushara - 4 cases
Winnebago - 106 cases (+4) (1 death)
Wood - 5 cases (+1)

Michigan's Upper Peninsula
Alger - 0 cases
Baraga - 1 case
Chippewa - 2 case
Delta - 14 cases (2 deaths)
Dickinson - 5 cases (2 deaths)
Gogebic - 4 cases (1 death)
Houghton - 2 cases
Iron - 0 cases
Keweenaw - 0 cases
Luce - 1 case
Mackinac - 6 cases
Marquette - 51 cases (10 deaths)
Menominee - 7 cases (+1)
Ontonagon - 0 cases
Schoolcraft - 4 cases

Burnett and Pepin counties each reported their first coronavirus patient. Burnett County's patient died. Only Langlade and Taylor counties have not have any positive test results.

Safer at Home
The Wisconsin Supreme Court ruled the Evers administration's extension of the Safer at Home order was illegal and therefore invalid (related story). In the wake of the ruling, some county and municipal health departments decided to extend the Safer at Home rules locally (related story).

Gov. Evers said he spoke with Republican legislative leaders who brought the lawsuit leading to Wednesday's ruling. He doesn't believe Republicans have a plan to replace Safer at Home despite weeks of assurances and telling the high court they had a plan.

"It was obvious to me through the conversation that the majority leadership was pretty much unconcerned with the confusion that having multiple counties and municipalities having different rules and regulations. They're pretty OK with that. They can speak to that. It was a respectful conversation, and as I said before there didn't seem to be any interest in having a gradual and safe reopening that was suggested to me in a letter not too long ago," the Democratic governor said.

Assembly Speaker Robin Vos (R-Burlington) said a statewide plan may not be necessary. "We already know that local health departments have the ability to utilize their power, which is already there to deal with those situations if they feel it’s unsafe."

Symptoms
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Symptoms that require immediate medical attention include:
  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to rouse
  • Bluish lips or face

The CDC says this is not an all-inclusive list. Consult a medical provider about any symptoms that are severe or concerning.

Prevention
The coronavirus is a new, or "novel," virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.

To help prevent the spread of the virus:

  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible. Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.
  • Clean frequently-touched surfaces and objects daily (e.g., tables, countertops, light switches, doorknobs, and cabinet handles).