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Wisconsin coronavirus cases spike even higher, so does testing

(NBC15)
Published: May. 1, 2020 at 2:06 PM CDT
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Wisconsin set all-time highs for the number of coronavirus tests and the number of positive results Friday.

There were 3,632 more tests returned in the past 24 hours.

From those, the state found 460 new cases -- far above yesterday's high of 334.

That's 12.67% of the tests that came back positive, putting Wisconsin on an upward trend for two days. 10.8% of tests were positive on Thursday, and 7% of tests the day before that.

Contributing to the spike, the state reports Brown County had 118 more confirmed cases than Thursday and Kenosha County had 86 more. Both counties have been doing more aggressive testing. Brown County focused on hotspots while Kenosha County opened drive-thru community testing.

Fortunately, the death toll has not kept pace with the spike in cases. Eleven patients with COVID-19 died since Thursday afternoon, bringing the death toll to 327. That's 4.4% of the positive cases.

In Wisconsin, no children or young adults under 20 have died from COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.

3,509 of the state's 7,314 coronavirus patients are considered recovered, or 48%. This means they've been medically cleared of symptoms and released from isolation or 30 days have passed since the onset of symptoms.

There was a slight improvement in the percentage of patients being hospitalized for treatment. Since February, 1,544 patients spent some time in the hospital, or 21%. That's down from 22%.

342 COVID-19 patients are currently hospitalized with 323 on mechanical ventilation. There are 127 in ICU.

The DHS says 68% of the state's hospital beds are occupied.

Wisconsin's governor and health officials say the readiness of the state's health care systems and a downward trend in the percentage of new cases are key factors in dialing back the Safer at Home orders while preventing widespread infection.

Cases county-by-county
Counties with additional cases and/or deaths are indicated in boldface. We've added the one-day change in totals.
Wisconsin

Adams - 4 cases (1 death)

Ashland - 2 cases

Barron - 6 cases

Bayfield - 3 cases (1 death)

Brown - 1,175 cases

(+118)

(5 deaths)

(+2)

Buffalo - 4 cases (1 death)

Burnett - 0 cases

Calumet - 14 cases

(+1)

Chippewa - 23 cases

(+1)

Clark - 20 cases (4 deaths)

Columbia - 28 cases

(+1) (1 death)

Crawford - 3 cases

Dane - 430 cases

(+2)

(23 deaths)

(+1)

Dodge - 36 cases

(+3) (1 death)

Door - 12 cases (2 deaths)

Douglas - 9 cases

Dunn - 9 cases

Eau Claire - 28 cases

Florence - 2 cases

Fond du Lac - 71 cases

(+2) (3 deaths)

Forest - 0 cases

Grant - 41 cases

(+4) (6 deaths)

Green - 13 cases

(+1)

Green Lake - 3 cases

(+1)

Iowa - 7 cases

Iron - 2 cases (1 death)

Jackson - 13 cases

(+1) (1 death)

Jefferson - 46 cases

(+1)

Juneau - 17 cases (1 death)

Kenosha - 477 cases

(+86)

(13 deaths)

(+2)

Kewaunee - 13 cases (1 death)

La Crosse - 28 cases

Lafayette - 6 cases

(+2)

Langlade - 0 cases

Lincoln - 1 case

(+1)

Manitowoc - 11 cases (1 death)

Marathon - 18 cases (1 death)

Marinette - 10 cases

(+2) (1 death)

Marquette - 3 cases (1 death)

Menominee - 1 case

Milwaukee - 2,940 cases

(+104)

(186 deaths)

(+5)

Monroe - 14 cases (1 death)

Oconto - 14 cases

(+4)

Oneida - 6 cases

Outagamie - 62 cases

(+8) (2 deaths)

Ozaukee - 88 cases (9 deaths)

Pepin - 0 cases

Pierce - 10 cases

Polk - 4 cases

Portage - 5 cases

Price - 1 case

Racine - 355 cases

(+28)

(13 deaths)

(+1)

Richland - 12 cases (2 deaths)

Rock - 222 cases

(+24) (6 deaths)

Rusk - 4 cases

Sauk - 58 cases

(+13) (3 deaths)

Sawyer - 3 cases

Shawano - 15 cases

(+5)

Sheboygan - 49 cases

(+2) (2 deaths)

St. Croix - 16 cases

Taylor - 0 cases

Trempealeau - 3 cases

Vernon - 1 case

Vilas - 4 cases

Walworth - 171 cases

(+10) (8 deaths)

Washburn - 1 case

Washington - 99 cases

(+1) (4 deaths)

Waukesha - 350 cases

(+14)

(20 deaths)

(+1)

Waupaca - 10 cases

(+2) (1 death)

Waushara - 2 cases

Winnebago - 62 cases

(+9) (1 death)

Wood - 2 cases

Michigan's Upper Peninsula

Alger - 0 cases

Baraga - 1 case

(+1)

Chippewa - 2 case

Delta - 13 cases (2 deaths)

Dickinson - 3 cases (2 deaths)

Gogebic - 4 cases (1 death)

Houghton - 2 cases

Iron - 0 cases

Keweenaw - 0 cases

Luce - 1 case

Mackinac - 6 cases

Marquette - 50 cases

(+4) (8 deaths)

Menominee - 5 cases

Ontonagon - 0 cases

Schoolcraft - 3 cases

Friday afternoon, the Appleton Health Department announced two more confirmed cases of COVID-19. One of the patients is hospitalized; the other is in isolation. Both patients live in Winnebago County. This brings the number of cases in the city to 30.

Lincoln County reported its first coronavirus patient. This leaves five Wisconsin counties without any confirmed cases: Burnett, Forest, Langlade, Pepin and Taylor.

Investigations

On Wednesday, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services reported public health investigations are underway at 187 businesses and group housing, health care and long-term facilities around the state.

The state doesn't identify the facilities or where they're located except by region and general function.

In the Northeast region, there are 30 investigations underway: 11 at long-term care facilities, 8 at workplaces, 7 in group housing facilities, 1 in a health care facility, and 3 sites that don't fall into those categories.

The DHS says it takes only one confirmed case at a long-term care facility to trigger an investigation. It takes two or more cases anywhere else.

Examples of a long-term care facility include nursing homes, assisted living and residential care apartment complexes.

Group housing facilities include prisons, jails, homeless shelters, dormitories and group homes.

Health care facilities may include hospitals, clinics, hospice or dialysis centers.

Workplaces include manufacturers, warehouses, offices and other indoor work settings.

Examples of other settings include child care centers, restaurants, event venues and places of worship.

The DHS will update the number of public health investigations every Wednesday.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently announced six more possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Symptoms that require immediate medical attention include:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to rouse
  • Bluish lips or face

The CDC says this is not an all-inclusive list. Consult a medical provider about any symptoms that are severe or concerning.

Prevention

The coronavirus is a new, or "novel," virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.

To help prevent the spread of the virus:

  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible. Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.
  • Clean frequently-touched surfaces and objects daily (e.g., tables, countertops, light switches, doorknobs, and cabinet handles).