Wisconsin coronavirus cases increase to 457; more than 8,000 test negative

FOND DU LAC, Wis. (WBAY) -- MARCH 24 UPDATE:

Wisconsin added more than 40 coronavirus cases from Monday to Tuesday.

New numbers from the Wisconsin Department of Health Services show the state has 457 confirmed cases. That's up from 416 confirmed cases reported on Monday.

The state added no new deaths from complications due to coronavirus. The statewide total remains at five--three men from Milwaukee County, one man from Fond du Lac, and one man from Ozaukee County.

DHS says 8,237 tests have come back negative.

CLICK HERE to track the outbreak in Wisconsin.

The increase in confirmed cases has been consistent over the past two days. Statewide cases increased by 35 from Sunday to Monday.

Growth appears to have slowed from over the weekend. From Saturday to Sunday, the state added 100 new cases -- the largest one-day increase since the state started tracking coronavirus on Feb. 5.

Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers has issued a month-long safer at home order that prohibits all "non-essential business" and prohibits "all non-essential travel" in the state during the coronavirus outbreak.

The order will go into effect at 8 a.m. Wednesday, March 25 and remain in effect until 8 a.m. on Friday, April 24, unless the governor announces otherwise.

CLICK HERE to view the governor's full safer at home order.

CLICK HERE for your guide to the safer at home order in Wisconsin.

CLICK HERE to view the list of essential businesses in Wisconsin.

"Individuals do not need special permission to leave their homes, but they must comply with this order as to when it is permissible to leave home," says Gov. Evers. "Similarly, if a business is an Essential Business or Operation as defined in this order, it does not need documentation or certification to continue its work that is done in compliance with this order."

VISIT wbay.com/coronavirus for local, national and international coverage of the pandemic.

Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

COVID-19 is spread when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

"The virus is found in droplets from the throat and nose. When someone coughs or sneezes, other people near them can breathe in those droplets. The virus can also spread when someone touches an object with the virus on it. If that person touches their mouth, face, or eyes the virus can make them sick," says the Wisconsin Department of Health Services.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention adds, "It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads."

The CDC believes symptoms may appear between two and 14 days after contact with an infected person.

Symptoms include fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Emergency signs include pain and pressure in the chest, confusion and bluish lips or face.

DHS recommends taking these steps to help stop the spread of the virus:

-Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially before eating and after going to the bathroom, blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
-If you do not have soap and water, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.
-Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
-Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
-Stay home when you are sick.
-Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
-Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.

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MARCH 23 UPDATE:

Gov. Tony Evers, Wisconsin Health officials and the Wisconsin National Guard held a news briefing Monday. CLICK HERE to watch on YouTube.

"This is important. Time is of the essence," warned Gov. Evers.

On Tuesday, Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers issued a month-long safer at home order that closes all "non-essential business" and prohibits "all non-essential travel" in the state during the coronavirus outbreak.

CLICK HERE to view the order.

The order will go into effect at 8 a.m. Wednesday, March 25 and remain in effect until 8 a.m. on Friday, April 24, unless there is another order issued to end it early.

CLICK HERE to find out what is defined as Essential Business in Wisconsin.

"Individuals do not need special permission to leave their homes, but they must comply with this order as to when it is permissible to leave home," says Gov. Evers. "Similarly, if a business is an Essential Business or Operation as defined in this order, it does not need documentation or certification to continue its work that is done in compliance with this order."

"Over the past few days, I’ve talked with public health experts and with business leaders and local elected officials around the state. Overwhelmingly the response I heard is that we need an all-hands-on-deck approach to stopping the spread of COVID-19 in Wisconsin," says Gov. Evers.

"They convinced me this is the right thing to do," he continues. "Experts and scientists made it clear to me this is the way to solve the problem."

"In fact, business leaders have suggested that it is imperative to slow the growth of the disease and that the state cease all non-essential business statewide."

CLICK HERE to see what is considered essential in Wisconsin.

"Workers providing essential care or services in our communities will be allowed to continue to travel to and from work. That includes folks like health care professionals, grocers, family caregivers, among other people whose work is critical for folks across our state," says Gov. Evers.

He added you can still go for a walk and a bike ride, but no other unnecessary trips, except to get groceries, medication, or see a doctor.

Over the weekend, the state asked FEMA for non-surgical masks, coveralls, N95 masks and gloves.

In addition, five task forces have been created to ensure health care workforce can continue to serve people.

Major General Paul Knapp of the National Guard says more than 300 have been called to active duty in Wisconsin right now, with some missions already completed.

Knapp said those missions included bringing cruise ship passengers home, six medics were dispatched to a senior living facility in Grafton, and added if there's a shortage, particularly having to do with medical, they can stand in until the health care provider can get more staff in.

Officials added a PPE buyback program website will go live within the next 48 hours.

Businesses which have closed as a result of the outbreak and no longer have use for PPE supplies are asked to donate them - those supplies include N95 respirators, face masks, gloves and thermometers, among other items.

Evers added he is proud of the people in Wisconsin who are doing the best they can to help their neighbors and communities, and for those who donated or made masks for health care providers.

Wisconsin has five deaths related to complications from COVID-19. The Milwaukee County Medical Examiner's Office is investigating the deaths of men ages 66, 69, and 54.

Fifty-five-year-old Dale Witkowski of Fond du Lac passed away from complications due to the virus. CLICK HERE to learn more about Dale Witkowski and why is family is asking to take the outbreak seriously.

An Ozaukee County man passed away from coronavirus complications.

DHS said Monday that 7,050 cases have come back negative.

BREAKDOWN OF TOTAL ACTIVE CASES BY COUNTY as of 3/23/2020

Bayfield - 1
Brown* - 3
Calumet - 1
Chippewa - 1
Columbia* - 5
Dane* - 61
Dodge - 2
Douglas - 2
Dunn - 1
Eau Claire - 4
Fond du Lac - 17
Green - 1
Jefferson - 2
Kenosha* - 12
La Crosse - 5
Marathon - 1
Milwaukee* - 204
Outagamie - 2
Ozaukee - 14
Pierce - 3
Racine - 5
Rock - 3
Sauk - 3
Sheboygan - 6
St. Croix - 3
Walworth - 3
Washington - 15
Waukesha* - 31
Winnebago - 5
Wood - 1

*An asterisk shows community spread has been identified.

On Saturday, Wisconsin Emergency Management asked FEMA for help with obtaining protective medical supplies--including N95 face masks, non-surgical masks, protective gloves, face shields, and coveralls.

From the national stockpile, the state has received more than 54,000 N95 masks; more than one million surgical masks; more than 24,000 face shields; more than 20,000 surgical gowns; more than 100 coveralls; and more than 72,000 gloves.

VISIT wbay.com/coronavirus for local, national and international coverage of the pandemic.

Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

COVID-19 is spread when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

"The virus is found in droplets from the throat and nose. When someone coughs or sneezes, other people near them can breathe in those droplets. The virus can also spread when someone touches an object with the virus on it. If that person touches their mouth, face, or eyes the virus can make them sick," says the Wisconsin Department of Health Services.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention adds, "It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads."

The CDC believes symptoms may appear between two and 14 days after contact with an infected person.

Symptoms include fever, cough, and shortness of breath. Emergency signs include pain and pressure in the chest, confusion and bluish lips or face.

DHS recommends taking these steps to help stop the spread of the virus:

-Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially before eating and after going to the bathroom, blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
-If you do not have soap and water, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.
-Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
-Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
-Stay home when you are sick.
-Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
-Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.