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DHS reports 13 new COVID-19 deaths, 75 new hospitalizations Saturday

Published: Feb. 27, 2021 at 2:30 PM CST
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MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – Wisconsin’s seven day averages for key metrics in measuring the spread of the novel coronavirus, which causes COVID-19, have held steady Saturday from Friday.

The state reported 13 new deaths, bringing the state’s COVID-19 death toll to 6,412. That’s more than double the number of deaths the state added to the toll on Friday, which was 5. However, the state’s 7-day average has returned to Wednesday’s average of 18 after jumping to 23 on Thursday. Except for Thursday, that figure has been below 20 for the past two weeks.

The state received 3,890 results for people tested, or testing for the coronavirus, for the first time Saturday. Out of those results, state officials say 689 more people were found to be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, which is 17.71% of all results. That figure is above the seven-day average of positive test results, which stands at 12.44%. That figure has been below 20% since February 9.

However, the state now measures the positivity rate by the results of all testing -- including people tested multiple times -- and by that measure, the 7-day average positivity rate remains steady at 2.3%. That percentage has been in decline during the past two months. The state is averaging 618 new coronavirus cases each day over the last 7 days.

The state reports new deaths in Brown, Kenosha, Manitowoc, Marinette, Milwaukee, Outagamie, Rock, Sauk and Walworth Counties. Meanwhile, the state revised the death count in Adams County.

Meanwhile, out of the 72 counties, six didn’t report any new cases, while another three counties had their case numbers revised.

County by county case and death figures are below.

Wisconsin saw an increase of 46,900 “shots in the arm” since Friday’s report. As reported Friday, more than half of adults 65 and older (52.7%) have now received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. So far, 20.7% of that population has completed their vaccine regimen. It’s been a little over a month since vaccination efforts for that age population started in earnest.

The state says more than 15% (15.3%) of all eligible residents have received at least one shot – a total of 888,684 people. More than half of them have received their second and final dose -- or 469,944 people. These numbers are preliminary for a few days as vaccinators’ reports continue to come in.

Health officials are encouraging people in minority groups to get vaccinated because of the disparity in the vaccination numbers and because minority groups are disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 virus. For more information about racial and ethnic disparities in the pandemic, CLICK HERE.

Earlier this week, state health officials said Wisconsin is on target to expand eligibility for the vaccine next Monday, March 1. The emphasis in that expanded group is educators and child care workers. However, the first priority is still vaccinating people 65 and older.

Deputy Health Secretary Julie Willems Van Dijk said Thursday, “We couldn’t take our whole vaccine supply and give it to educators, because we need to keep vaccine available for people who are 65 plus. So the plan is that we continue in that 70- to 80,000 dose level going out to our vaccinators to continue to vaccinate people 65 plus, and as they finish those groups move on to other eligible groups.”

  • Education and child care: Includes preschool to grade 12, higher education, community learning programs, and Boys & Girls Club and YMCA staff members
  • People enrolled in Medicaid long-term care programs, such as Family Care and IRIS
  • Some public-facing frontline workers, including public transit and people responsible for utility and communications infrastructure
  • 911 operators
  • Workers in the food supply chain: Farms; production plants; food retail, which includes supermarkets and convenience stores selling groceries; and hunger relief distribution
  • Congregate living: Residents and staff of domestic abuse and homeless shelters; housing for the elderly or people with disabilities; prisons and jails; mental health facilities; some employer-based housing
  • Non-frontline essential health care: Emergency management; cyber security; critical support roles such as cleaning, HVAC and refrigeration; critical supply chain, such as production and distribution of vaccine

This is not an all-inclusive list, and vaccinations will be dependent on local vaccine supply. Even with the increased allocation coming from the federal government next week, the DHS says 700,000 people fall into these groups and it will take about two months to vaccinate everyone who qualifies.

The Oconto County Health Department, for one, says it won’t vaccinate the expanded group until the week of March 15 or when 50% of older adults in the county are vaccinated, whichever comes later, because it doesn’t have an adequate supply of vaccines.

Action 2 News continues updating its guide to vaccination clinics and health agencies distributing the COVID-19 vaccine. CLICK HERE for locations and phone numbers and websites to register.

HOSPITALIZATIONS

The DHS says 75 people were hospitalized for COVID-19 in the past 24-hour period, which remains above the 7-day average of 53 hospitalizations. More than 26,000 people in the state (26,088) were hospitalized for COVID-19 treatment at some point, or 4.6% of all cases.

The Wisconsin Hospital Association reports 304 people are hospitalized with COVID-19 across the state Saturday, with 80 of them in intensive care units. The total number of patients held steady from Friday, however the number of patients in the ICU decreased by 9. Saturday marks the fourth time this month that ICU’s had fewer than 90 COVID-19 patients, which didn’t happen in any month since our hospitalization record-keeping began on August 1.

Locally, there are 11 COVID-19 patients hospitalized in the Fox Valley region, including 3 in ICU. That’s the same in ICU as Thursday and Friday but 2 fewer patients overall.

The Northeast region’s 10 hospitals were treating 31 patients, eight fewer than Friday, with 14 in ICU, which is one more patient than 24 hours earlier.

HOSPITAL READINESS

In terms of hospital readiness, the WHA reported 302 ICU beds (20.60%) and 2,374 of all medical beds (21.25%) -- ICU, intermediate care, medical surgical and negative flow isolation beds -- are open in the state’s 134 hospitals.

The Fox Valley’s 13 hospitals had 11 open ICU beds (10.57%) among them and 108 of all medical beds (12.66%) open for the eight counties they serve.

In the Northeast region, the hospitals have 47 ICU beds (22.7%) and 274 of all medical beds (28.66%) available.

These are beds for all patients, not just COVID-19, and because a bed is open or available doesn’t mean a hospital can put a patient in it if there isn’t enough staffing, including doctors, nurses and food services.

Since February 5, 2020

  • 3,186,994 people in Wisconsin have tested for the virus at least once
  • 548,884 people who tested positive for infection have recovered (97.4%)
  • 8,041 people tested positive for the virus within the past 30 days and are considered active cases (1.4%)
  • 6,412 people in the state have died from COVID-19 (1.1% of all confirmed cases)

SATURDAY’S COUNTY CASE AND DEATH TOTALS (Counties with new cases or deaths are indicated in bold) *

Wisconsin

  • Adams – 1,578 cases (+1) (10 deaths) (State revised, decrease of 1)
  • Ashland – 1,175 cases (16 deaths)
  • Barron – 5,353 cases (+17) (76 deaths)
  • Bayfield - 1,064 cases (19 deaths)
  • Brown – 30,176 cases (State revised, decrease of 5) (223 deaths) (+1)
  • Buffalo – 1,318 cases (+2) (7 deaths)
  • Burnett – 1,200 cases (+3) (23 deaths)
  • Calumet – 5,467 cases (+6) (43 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 7,039 cases (+10) (92 deaths)
  • Clark – 3,155 cases (+1) (57 deaths)
  • Columbia – 5,024 cases (+6) (51 deaths)
  • Crawford – 1,667 cases (State revised, decrease of 2) (17 deaths)
  • Dane – 40,428 (+163) (273 deaths)
  • Dodge – 11,415 cases (+18) (155 deaths)
  • Door – 2,417 cases (+3) (20 deaths)
  • Douglas – 3,674 cases (+4) (26 deaths)
  • Dunn – 4,255 cases (+2) (28 deaths)
  • Eau Claire – 11,002 cases (+15) (104 deaths)
  • Florence - 434 cases (State revised, decrease of 1) (12 deaths)
  • Fond du Lac – 11,973 cases (+15) (93 deaths)
  • Forest - 925 cases (+1) (23 deaths)
  • Grant – 4,643 cases (+7) (80 deaths)
  • Green – 3,146 cases (+25) (16 deaths)
  • Green Lake - 1,525 cases (+1) (18 deaths)
  • Iowa - 1,853 cases (+1) (9 deaths)
  • Iron - 540 cases (+1) (20 deaths)
  • Jackson - 2,575 cases (+1) (23 deaths)
  • Jefferson – 7,863 cases (+3) (111 deaths)
  • Juneau - 2,981 cases (19 deaths)
  • Kenosha – 14,817 cases (+19) (300 deaths) (+1)
  • Kewaunee – 2,414 cases (+1) (27 deaths)
  • La Crosse – 12,211 cases (+19) (78 deaths)
  • Lafayette - 1,459 cases (+1) (7 deaths)
  • Langlade - 1,934 cases (32 deaths)
  • Lincoln – 2,907 cases (+5) (58 deaths)
  • Manitowoc – 7,239 cases (+2) (64 deaths) (+1)
  • Marathon – 13,670 cases (+18) (176 deaths)
  • Marinette - 3,981 cases (+2) (63 deaths) (+1)
  • Marquette – 1,306 cases (+3) (21 deaths)
  • Menominee - 795 cases (11 deaths)
  • Milwaukee – 98,143 (+70) (1,237 deaths) (+6)
  • Monroe – 4,314 cases (+7) (31 deaths)
  • Oconto – 4,261 cases (+5) (48 deaths)
  • Oneida - 3,374 cases (+16) (67 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 19,236 cases (+21) (195 deaths) (+1)
  • Ozaukee – 7,626 cases (+4) (77 deaths)
  • Pepin – 806 cases (7 deaths)
  • Pierce – 3,470 cases (+6) (33 deaths)
  • Polk – 3,909 cases (+4) (44 deaths)
  • Portage – 6,472 cases (+9) (64 deaths)
  • Price – 1,156 cases (+2) (7 deaths)
  • Racine – 20,331 cases (+14) (320 deaths)
  • Richland - 1,287 cases (+1) (14 deaths)
  • Rock – 14,396 cases (+12) (159 deaths) (+2)
  • Rusk - 1,253 cases (16 deaths)
  • Sauk – 5,276 cases (+5) (41 deaths) (+1)
  • Sawyer - 1,511 cases (+1) (21 deaths)
  • Shawano – 4,594 cases (+2) (70 deaths)
  • Sheboygan – 12,884 cases (+18) (128 deaths)
  • St. Croix – 6,379 cases (+9) (43 deaths)
  • Taylor - 1,799 cases (+1) (21 deaths)
  • Trempealeau – 3,386 cases (+2) (36 deaths)
  • Vernon – 1,830 cases (+2) (36 deaths)
  • Vilas - 2,130 cases (+11) (36 deaths)
  • Walworth – 8,838 cases (+11) (127 deaths) (+1)
  • Washburn – 1,293 cases (+1) (18 deaths)
  • Washington – 13,741 cases (+14) (134 deaths)
  • Waukesha – 40,588 cases (+54) (482 deaths)
  • Waupaca – 4,781 cases (+7) (112 deaths)
  • Waushara – 2,099 cases (+1) (31 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 17,044 cases (+6) (183 deaths)
  • Wood – 6,691 cases (+5) (73 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula **

  • Alger - 277 cases (1 death)
  • Baraga - 507 cases (32 deaths)
  • Chippewa - 722 cases (+2) (23 deaths)
  • Delta – 2,654 cases (+4) (65 deaths)
  • Dickinson - 2,131 cases (55 deaths)
  • Gogebic - 928 cases (19 deaths)
  • Houghton – 2,127 cases (+4) (33 deaths)
  • Iron – 866 cases (40 deaths)
  • Keweenaw – 115 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Luce – 132 cases
  • Mackinac - 290 cases (3 deaths)
  • Marquette - 3,456 cases (+1) (54 deaths)
  • Menominee - 1,616 cases (+1) (35 deaths)
  • Ontonagon – 358 cases (State revised, decrease of 1) (19 deaths)
  • Schoolcraft - 229 cases (State revised, decrease of 2) (4 deaths)

* Cases and deaths are from the daily DHS COVID-19 reports, which may differ from local health department numbers. The DHS reports cases from all health departments within a county’s boundaries, including tribal, municipal and county health departments; county websites may not. Also, public health departments update their data at various times, whereas the DHS freezes the numbers it receives by the same time every day to compile the afternoon report.

The DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their death. Most of the people severely affected by the coronavirus have underlying illnesses or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or obesity, which raises a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19. They would’ve lived longer if not for their infection. The state may revise case and death numbers after further review, such as the victim’s residence, duplicated records, or a correction in lab results. Details can be found on the DHS website and Frequently Asked Questions.

**The state of Michigan does not update numbers on Sundays. Monday’s numbers include updates since Saturday’s reporting deadline.

COVID-19 Tracing App

Wisconsin’s COVID-19 tracing app, “Wisconsin Exposure Notification,” is available for iOS and Android smartphones. No download is required for iPhones. The Android app is available on Google Play. When two phones with the app (and presumably their owners) are close enough, for long enough, they’ll anonymously share a random string of numbers via Bluetooth. If someone tests positive for the coronavirus, they’ll receive a code to type into the app. If your phones “pinged” each other in the last 14 days, you’ll receive a push notification that you are at risk of exposure. The app doesn’t collect personal information or location information, so you won’t know from whom or where, but you will be told what day the exposure might have occurred so that you can quarantine for the appropriate amount of time.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it.
  • Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments

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