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Wisconsin reports 2,177 new coronavirus cases, 45 deaths

Hospitalization numbers for COVID-19 are declining
(Associated Press)
Published: Jan. 21, 2021 at 2:22 PM CST|Updated: Jan. 21, 2021 at 3:54 PM CST
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MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – If you look at these reports day by day, Wisconsin received mixed news in its fight against the coronavirus. If you look at the 7-day trends, however, Wisconsin is winning some battles.

According to the state Department of Health Services, there were 8,687 people who were being tested or testing positive for the COVID-19 virus for the first time -- the most results by this measure since last week. Twenty-five percent of these (25.06%) were positive, which is in line with the 7-day average positivity rate (25.56%), identifying 2,177 new cases. This is the first time in a week the state had more than 2,000 new cases in one day, but the 7-day average is down to 1,731 cases a day, the lowest since Sept. 20.

Wisconsin added 45 people to the death toll, which is now 5,607. The 7-day average is also 45, and the percentage of deaths of all known coronavirus cases held steady after rising to 1.06% on Wednesday.

Six of the deaths were in Brown County, and there were two each in Door, Fond du Lac, Manitowoc and Sheboygan counties. The remaining were in Clark, Columbia, Eau Claire (3), Kenosha, La Crosse, Langlade, Marathon, Marinette, Milwaukee (5), Monroe (2), Ozaukee, Racine, Rock (2), Shawano, Walworth, Washington (2) and Waukesha (5) counties.

Three counties -- Florence, Iron and Langlade -- did not have any new coronavirus cases Thursday. County case and death numbers appear later in this article.

The DHS also tracks results for people tested multiple times, such as health care workers or patients being treated for COVID-19. By that measure, the positivity rate’s 7-day average was at 7.2% for a second day on Wednesday. The DHS calculation is a day behind because it’s based on preliminary numbers, including negative tests undergoing further review. Reporting one test per person, no matter how many times they’re tested, is considered a better indicator of the virus’s spread in the community (it’s how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention compiles its own reports).

There are now 23,965 active cases in Wisconsin, up slightly from Wednesday’s figure. These are people who noticed their COVID-19 symptoms or tested positive in the last 30 days and haven’t been medically cleared, and is 4.5% of all cases dating back to last February. Almost 500,000 people diagnosed with the virus (498,368) are considered recovered, though the state acknowledges some of them may be feeling lingering effects from their infection, such as brain fog, headaches and muscle aches or lethargy.

The state is nearing 3 million people tested for the coronavirus (2,985,133) since the first patient was treated on February 5, 2020. That’s more than half of the state’s population.

VACCINATIONS

The DHS reports 285,358 doses of COVID-19 vaccine have been administered since December 13. That’s almost 25,000 more “shots in the arm” (24,956) compared to Wednesday’s report.

6,163 of these shots were for the second and final dose. To date, 51,801 people have completed their vaccine regimen.

These numbers are preliminary for a few days as vaccinators’ reports continue coming in.

The DHS now includes vaccination information by age and gender on its website (CLICK HERE). The vaccine data page also lets you narrow down vaccinations per day by county or Healthcare Emergency Readiness Coalition (HERC) -- use the pulldown menu at the upper right corner of the graph at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/vaccine-data.htm#day.

Hospitalizations

Current hospitalizations for COVID-19 continue a dramatic decline.

The DHS reported 82 hospitalizations for COVID-19 symptoms in the past 24 hours -- back down in the double digits. The 7-day average is down to 92 admissions per day. A total 23,445 people have been hospitalized at some point in the past year for COVID-19, or 4.44% of all cases.

Thursday, the Wisconsin Hospital Association (WHA) reports 808 patients are currently in hospitals for COVID-19 treatment, including 173 in ICU. That’s 20 fewer patients in ICU and 26 fewer patients overall compared to Wednesday taking deaths, discharges and new admissions into account. That’s 190 fewer patients overall than a week ago, and it’s been eight days since the state’s hospitals had more than 1,000 COVID-19 patients at one time.

Sixty-nine of these patients are being treated in the Fox Valley region, including 5 in ICU. That’s 3 fewer in ICU than Wednesday but six more patients overall.

There are 100 COVID-19 patients in the Northeast region’s hospitals, including 21 in ICU, about the same as Wednesday.

Hospital Readiness

The WHA also reported the state’s 134 hospitals have 227 ICU beds (15.5%) and 2,120 of all types of medical beds (19.0%) open -- that’s ICU, intermediate care, medical surgical and negative flow isolation.

The Fox Valley’s 13 hospitals had 15 ICU beds (14.4%) among them and 123 medical beds total (14.4%) open for the eight counties they serve.

The Northeast region’s 10 hospitals had 21 ICU beds (10.1%) and 228 of all medical beds (23.8%) for patients in seven counties.

These beds are for all patients, not just COVID-19. We use the term “open” instead of “available” because whether a bed can be filled depends on whether the hospital has enough staffing for a patient in that bed, including doctors, nurses and food services.

THURSDAY’S COUNTY NUMBERS (Counties with new cases or deaths are indicated in bold) *

Wisconsin

  • Adams – 1,453 cases (+10) (11 deaths)
  • Ashland – 1,110 cases (+9) (16 deaths)
  • Barron – 4,950 cases (+21) (66 deaths)
  • Bayfield - 1,012 cases (+7) (18 deaths)
  • Brown – 28,595 cases (+114) (186 deaths) (+6)
  • Buffalo – 1,215 cases (+16) (7 deaths)
  • Burnett – 1,070 cases (+3) (23 deaths)
  • Calumet – 5,081 cases (+20) (39 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 6,599 cases (+39) (74 deaths)
  • Clark – 3,031 cases (+13) (56 deaths) (+1)
  • Columbia – 4,687 cases (+23) (39 deaths) (+1)
  • Crawford – 1,622 cases (+1) (14 deaths)
  • Dane – 36,746 cases (+157) (228 deaths)
  • Dodge – 10,984 cases (+33) (133 deaths)
  • Door – 2,308 cases (+5) (18 deaths) (+2)
  • Douglas – 3,460 cases (+17) (18 deaths)
  • Dunn – 3,913 cases (+37) (25 deaths)
  • Eau Claire – 10,233 cases (+56) (95 deaths) (+3)
  • Florence - 417 cases (12 deaths)
  • Fond du Lac – 11,311 cases (+14) (76 deaths) (+2)
  • Forest - 897 cases (+3) (22 deaths)
  • Grant – 4,385 cases (+21) (78 deaths)
  • Green – 2,576 cases (+7) (11 deaths)
  • Green Lake - 1,456 cases (+2) (14 deaths)
  • Iowa - 1,771 cases (+3) (9 deaths)
  • Iron - 451 cases (19 deaths)
  • Jackson - 2,514 cases (+7) (20 deaths)
  • Jefferson – 7,337 cases (+30) (64 deaths)
  • Juneau - 2,816 cases (+11) (15 deaths)
  • Kenosha – 13,869 cases (+49) (257 deaths) (+1)
  • Kewaunee – 2,280 cases (+16) (26 deaths)
  • La Crosse – 11,193 cases (+30) (69 deaths) (+1)
  • Lafayette - 1,341 cases (+8) (7 deaths)
  • Langlade - 1,873 cases (30 deaths)
  • Lincoln – 2,731 cases (+8) (52 deaths)
  • Manitowoc – 6,752 cases (+26) (59 deaths) (+2)
  • Marathon – 13,010 cases (+40) (168 deaths) (+1)
  • Marinette - 3,829 cases (+14) (57 deaths) (+1)
  • Marquette – 1,233 cases (+1) (20 deaths)
  • Menominee - 776 cases (+2) (11 deaths)
  • Milwaukee – 92,590 (+341) (1,111 deaths) (+5)
  • Monroe – 3,912 cases (+30) (30 deaths) (+2)
  • Oconto – 4,082 cases (+12) (44 deaths)
  • Oneida - 3,054 cases (+16) (53 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 17,844 cases (+55) (170 deaths)
  • Ozaukee – 7,138 cases (+45) (66 deaths) (+1)
  • Pepin – 760 cases (+2) (7 deaths)
  • Pierce – 3,226 cases (+22) (32 deaths)
  • Polk – 3,448 cases (+22) (37 deaths)
  • Portage – 5,987 cases (+19) (57 deaths)
  • Price – 1,050 cases (+15) (7 deaths)
  • Racine – 19,407 cases (+163) (281 deaths) (+1)
  • Richland - 1,193 cases (+8) (13 deaths)
  • Rock – 13,382 cases (+47) (133 deaths) (+2)
  • Rusk - 1,206 cases (+4) (14 deaths)
  • Sauk – 4,920 cases (+22) (35 deaths)
  • Sawyer - 1,352 cases (+3) (17 deaths)
  • Shawano – 4,430 cases (+9) (65 deaths) (+1)
  • Sheboygan – 12,251 cases (+18) (111 deaths) (+2)
  • St. Croix – 5,927 cases (+24) (36 deaths)
  • Taylor - 1,718 cases (+4) (19 deaths)
  • Trempealeau – 3,224 cases (+9) (33 deaths)
  • Vernon – 1,681 cases (+4) (32 deaths)
  • Vilas - 1,832 cases (+14) (31 deaths)
  • Walworth – 8,414 cases (+45) (115 deaths) (+1)
  • Washburn – 1,175 cases (+8) (15 deaths)
  • Washington – 12,959 cases (+47) (113 deaths) (+2)
  • Waukesha – 38,151 cases (+161) (410 deaths) (+5)
  • Waupaca – 4,489 cases (+31) (103 deaths)
  • Waushara – 2,014 cases (+5) (24 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 16,218 cases (+74) (166 deaths)
  • Wood – 6,180 cases (+25) (63 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula **

  • Alger - 250 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Baraga - 484 cases (+2) (30 deaths) (+1)
  • Chippewa - 676 cases (+3) (19 deaths) (+3)
  • Delta – 2,590 cases (+3) (62 deaths) (+1)
  • Dickinson - 2,078 cases (+2) (56 deaths)
  • Gogebic - 797 cases (+2) (15 deaths)
  • Houghton – 1,913 cases (+18) (29 deaths) (+2)
  • Iron – 836 cases (35 deaths) (+3)
  • Keweenaw – 99 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Luce – 129 cases
  • Mackinac - 272 cases (3 deaths)
  • Marquette - 3,365 cases (+9) (53 deaths)
  • Menominee - 1,566 cases (+4) (34 deaths)
  • Ontonagon – 304 cases (+7) (16 deaths)
  • Schoolcraft - 225 cases (4 deaths)

* Cases and deaths are from the daily DHS COVID-19 reports, which may differ from local health department numbers. The DHS reports cases from all health departments within a county’s boundaries, including tribal, municipal and county health departments; county websites may not. Also, public health departments update their data at various times, whereas the DHS freezes the numbers it receives by the same time every day to compile the afternoon report.

The DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their death. Most of the people severely affected by the coronavirus have underlying illnesses or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or obesity, which raises a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19. They would’ve lived longer if not for their infection. The state may revise case and death numbers after further review, such as the victim’s residence, duplicated records, or a correction in lab results. Details can be found on the DHS website and Frequently Asked Questions.

**The state of Michigan does not update numbers on Sundays. Monday’s numbers include updates since Saturday’s reporting deadline.

COVID-19 Tracing App

Wisconsin’s COVID-19 tracing app, “Wisconsin Exposure Notification,” is available for iOS and Android smartphones. No download is required for iPhones. The Android app is available on Google Play. When two phones with the app (and presumably their owners) are close enough, for long enough, they’ll anonymously share a random string of numbers via Bluetooth. If someone tests positive for the coronavirus, they’ll receive a code to type into the app. If your phones “pinged” each other in the last 14 days, you’ll receive a push notification that you are at risk of exposure. The app doesn’t collect personal information or location information, so you won’t know from whom or where, but you will be told what day the exposure might have occurred so that you can quarantine for the appropriate amount of time.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it.
  • Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments

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