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Coronavirus in Wisconsin: New cases slightly over 1,000 Monday; death rate climbs

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Coronavirus generic(WRDW)
Published: Jan. 18, 2021 at 2:11 PM CST|Updated: Jan. 18, 2021 at 3:47 PM CST
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MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – The Wisconsin Department of Health Services reported slightly over 1,000 new coronavirus cases Monday. The 1,083 new cases is the third-fewest in a month (the state received 632 positive results the day after Christmas and 1,078 positive results the day after New Year’s, both on Saturdays). It’s the lowest number that wasn’t close to a major holiday since 771 cases on September 14 .

That was about one-fifth (21.10%) of the 5,132 coronavirus tests the state received. The remaining 4,049 tests were negative. New cases were identified in 65 of Wisconsin’s 72 counties; Brown, Crawford, Florence, Forest, Iron, Kewaunee and Pepin were exceptions.

Over the past 7 days, Wisconsin averaged 2,076 new cases a day. That’s the lowest in 3 weeks. The 7-day average for the positivity rate is also at a 3-week low.

But the COVID-19 death rate went back up to 1.05% of all cases with the deaths of 19 more people reported. Seventeen of the deaths were in Milwaukee County. The remaining two were in Columbia and Green counties.

The death rate was at 1.05% on Saturday when the DHS record 128 COVID-19 related deaths to the death toll. Wisconsin is averaging 44 deaths per day over the past week.

County-by-county case and death numbers are listed later in this article.

The DHS also tracks results for people tested multiple times, such as health care workers or patients being treated for COVID-19. By that measure, the positivity rate’s 7-day average is down to 7.8%. That DHS calculation is based on preliminary numbers, including negative tests undergoing further review. Reporting one test per person, no matter how many times they’re tested, is considered a better indicator of the virus’s spread in the community and is how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention compiles its own reports.

It’s been almost a year since the coronavirus was confirmed in Wisconsin. The state has tested almost 3 million people (2,964,720), confirming more than half a million (522,877) cases:

  • 5,470 have died (1.05%)
  • 491,962 are considered recovered (94.1%)
  • 25,284 are active cases (4.8%), meaning they were diagnosed or had an onset of symptoms in the past 30 days who haven’t been medically cleared.

That’s 9% of Wisconsin’s population that’s tested positive.

Vaccinations

New figures from the DHS on Monday show 239,102 shots of Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine were administered. That’s 26,046 more than the last report on Friday. By our calculations, the state averaged 11,875 “shots in the arm” over the past 7 days, a new 7-day high.

The state also reports 35,924 people received their second dose and finished their vaccination series, about 5,100 more than Friday’s report.

You can see a graph of vaccinations per day by county or Healthcare Emergency Readiness Coalition (HERC) at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/vaccine-data.htm#day (use the pulldown menu at the upper right corner of the graph). Keep in mind these numbers are preliminary until undergoing a few days of review.

Phase 1b

The public comment period for who should be included in the next phase of COVID-19 vaccinations ends at 4 P.M. on Monday, Jan. 18. A DHS subcommittee recommended three broad groups: People over 70, people in congregate settings (such as jails, homeless shelters, and employer housing) that weren’t included in phase 1a, and more essential workers (including educators in face-to-face learning and first responders and health care workers who weren’t included in phase 1a). Read details of the recommendations HERE. As reported by our sister station, Wisconsin grocers are pushing to be included during the phase 1B vaccination.

Hospitalizations

The DHS reported 54 COVID-19 hospitalizations in the past 24-hour period Monday. It’s the third time in 7 days hospitalizations were in double digits, and the 10th time this month. To date, 23,130 people have been hospitalized at some point for serious COVID-19 symptoms, or 4.42% of all cases.

As of Monday, the Wisconsin Hospital Association (WHA) reported 875 COVID-19 patients being treated in hospitals, with 209 of them in intensive care units. That’s 2 more in ICU and 22 more patients overall than Sunday. It was the second day in a row with fewer than 900 current hospitalizations, which hasn’t happened since mid- October, and the 7th day this month.

The Fox Valley region’s 13 hospitals are treating 74 COVID-19 patients, including 8 in ICU. That’s 2 more in the ICU from Sunday and 4 more overall.

The Northeast region’s 10 hospitals were treating 95 COVID-19 patients, with 26 in ICU – 6 more in ICU and 13 more overall in the last day.

Daily changes in hospitalization numbers take discharges, deaths and new admissions into account.

On Monday, the alternate care facility at State Fair Park had one patient receiving outpatient Bamlanivimab infusion therapy. Once again it did not have any overflow COVID-19 patients from state hospitals.

Hospital Readiness

Also according to the WHA, the state’s 134 hospitals have 277 ICU beds open (18.9%) and 2,083 of all types of medical beds (18.6%) open -- ICU, intermediate care, medical surgical and negative flow isolation.

The Fox Valley region has 16 ICU beds (15.4%) and 1116 medical beds total (13.6%) open for the eight counties they serve.

The Northeast region’s 10 hospitals had 32 ICU beds (15.5%) and 225 of all medical beds (23.5%) open for patients in seven counties.

These beds are for all patients, not just COVID-19. We use the term “open” instead of “available” because whether a bed can be filled depends on whether the hospital has the staff necessary for a patient, including doctors, nurses and food services.

MONDAY’S COUNTY CASES AND DEATHS (Counties with new cases or deaths are indicated in bold) *

Wisconsin

  • Adams – 1,431 cases (+6) (11 deaths)
  • Ashland – 1,089 cases (+4) (16 deaths)
  • Barron – 4,911 cases (+22) (64 deaths)
  • Bayfield - 998 cases (+3) (18 deaths)
  • Brown – 28,282 cases (178 deaths)
  • Buffalo – 1,182 cases (+4) (7 deaths)
  • Burnett – 1,060 cases (+1) (23 deaths)
  • Calumet – 5,039 cases (+6) (38 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 6,534 cases (+21) (72 deaths)
  • Clark – 3,001 cases (+12) (54 deaths)
  • Columbia – 4,631 cases (+16) (38 deaths) (+1)
  • Crawford – 1,617 cases (13 deaths) (cases revised -2 by state)
  • Dane – 36,522 cases (+89) (218 deaths)
  • Dodge – 10,927 cases (+8) (129 deaths)
  • Door – 2,278 cases (+2) (16 deaths)
  • Douglas – 3,378 cases (+12) (17 deaths)
  • Dunn – 3,854 cases (+11) (25 deaths)
  • Eau Claire – 10,124 cases (+18) (92 deaths)
  • Florence - 412 cases (12 deaths)
  • Fond du Lac – 11,208 cases (+39) (73 deaths)
  • Forest - 893 cases (22 deaths)
  • Grant – 4,345 cases (+10) (77 deaths)
  • Green – 2,551 cases (+5) (11 deaths) (+1)
  • Green Lake - 1,446 cases (+1) (14 deaths)
  • Iowa - 1,761 cases (+3) (8 deaths)
  • Iron - 445 cases (19 deaths)
  • Jackson - 2,496 cases (+4) (20 deaths)
  • Jefferson – 7,262 cases (+43) (63 deaths)
  • Juneau - 2,786 cases (+3) (13 deaths)
  • Kenosha – 13,687 cases (+11) (248 deaths)
  • Kewaunee – 2,238 cases (26 deaths)
  • La Crosse – 11,078 cases (+53) (67 deaths)
  • Lafayette - 1,326 cases (+1) (7 deaths)
  • Langlade - 1,871 cases (+3) (30 deaths)
  • Lincoln – 2,707 cases (+4) (51 deaths)
  • Manitowoc – 6,700 cases (+25) (57 deaths)
  • Marathon – 12,902 cases (+19) (167 deaths)
  • Marinette - 3,798 cases (+4) (55 deaths)
  • Marquette – 1,223 cases (+1) (20 deaths)
  • Menominee - 771 cases (+1) (11 deaths)
  • Milwaukee – 91,657 (+123) (1,100 deaths) (+17)
  • Monroe – 3,854 cases (+7) (27 deaths)
  • Oconto – 4,053 cases (+5) (43 deaths)
  • Oneida - 3,025 cases (+7) (49 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 17,688 cases (+54) (169 deaths)
  • Ozaukee – 7,024 cases (+14) (63 deaths)
  • Pepin – 753 cases (6 deaths)
  • Pierce – 3,190 cases (+8) (32 deaths)
  • Polk – 3,400 cases (+11) (30 deaths)
  • Portage – 5,931 cases (+7) (57 deaths)
  • Price – 1,023 cases (+10) (6 deaths)
  • Racine – 19,128 cases (+11) (276 deaths)
  • Richland - 1,187 cases (+2) (13 deaths)
  • Rock – 13,256 cases (+38) (129 deaths)
  • Rusk - 1,196 cases (+6) (14 deaths)
  • Sauk – 4,880 cases (+13) (34 deaths)
  • Sawyer - 1,335 cases (+2) (17 deaths)
  • Shawano – 4,400 cases (+9) (64 deaths)
  • Sheboygan – 12,173 cases (+24) (108 deaths)
  • St. Croix – 5,864 cases (+22) (35 deaths)
  • Taylor - 1,703 cases (+8) (19 deaths)
  • Trempealeau – 3,193 cases (+7) (33 deaths)
  • Vernon – 1,670 cases (+8) (32 deaths)
  • Vilas - 1,812 cases (+6) (31 deaths)
  • Walworth – 8,329 cases (+8) (114 deaths)
  • Washburn – 1,157 cases (+6) (15 deaths)
  • Washington – 12,827 cases (+14) (108 deaths)
  • Waukesha – 37,761 cases (+144) (392 deaths)
  • Waupaca – 4,439 cases (+4) (102 deaths)
  • Waushara – 2,003 cases (+7) (24 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 16,081 cases (+26) (165 deaths)
  • Wood – 6,121 cases (+9) (63 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula (includes Saturday-Monday) **

  • Alger - 236 cases (+12) (1 death)
  • Baraga - 480 cases (+1) (29 deaths)
  • Chippewa - 671 cases (+7) (16 deaths)
  • Delta – 2,579 cases (+9) (61 deaths) (+1)
  • Dickinson - 2,067 cases (+11) (56 deaths)
  • Gogebic - 787 cases (+18) (16 deaths)
  • Houghton – 1,832 cases (+41) (27 deaths)
  • Iron – 827 cases (+8) (32 deaths)
  • Keweenaw – 96 cases (+5) (1 death)
  • Luce – 129 cases (+1)
  • Mackinac - 270 cases (3 deaths)
  • Marquette - 3,330 cases (+14) (53 deaths) (+1)
  • Menominee - 1,555 cases (+8) (34 deaths)
  • Ontonagon – 291 cases (+3) (15 deaths)
  • Schoolcraft - 224 cases (+1) (4 deaths) (+1)

* Cases and deaths are from the daily DHS COVID-19 reports, which may differ from local health department numbers. The DHS reports cases from all health departments within a county’s boundaries, including tribal, municipal and county health departments; county websites may not. Also, public health departments update their data at various times, whereas the DHS freezes the numbers it receives by the same time every day to compile the afternoon report.

The DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their death. Most of the people severely affected by the coronavirus have underlying illnesses or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or obesity, which raises a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19. They would’ve lived longer if not for their infection. The state may revise case and death numbers after further review, such as the victim’s residence, duplicated records, or a correction in lab results. Details can be found on the DHS website and Frequently Asked Questions.

**The state of Michigan does not update numbers on Sundays. Monday’s numbers include updates since Saturday’s reporting deadline.

COVID-19 Tracing App

Wisconsin’s COVID-19 tracing app, “Wisconsin Exposure Notification,” is available for iOS and Android smartphones. No download is required for iPhones. The Android app is available on Google Play. When two phones with the app (and presumably their owners) are close enough, for long enough, they’ll anonymously share a random string of numbers via Bluetooth. If someone tests positive for the coronavirus, they’ll receive a code to type into the app. If your phones “pinged” each other in the last 14 days, you’ll receive a push notification that you are at risk of exposure. The app doesn’t collect personal information or location information, so you won’t know from whom or where, but you will be told what day the exposure might have occurred so that you can quarantine for the appropriate amount of time.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it.
  • Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments

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