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DHS reports record amount of COVID-19 deaths for one day

Coronavirus
Coronavirus(CDC)
Published: Jan. 16, 2021 at 2:22 PM CST
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MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – Wisconsin health officials are reporting a record-breaking amount of deaths attributed to COVID-19 throughout the past 24 hours.

According to the Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS), 128 people died from COVID-19 since Friday afternoon. The previous record of deaths from COVID-19 reported in a single day was 120, set on December 22nd. (CLICK HERE for that day’s article.) State health officials reported a total of 165 deaths from Monday – Friday this past week.

Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers has previously announced his administration will declare another public health emergency, extending the statewide face mask requirement for another 60 days.

The DHS also reported fewer new cases Saturday compared to other days this past week. The state received 7,032 results for people getting tested or testing positive for coronavirus for the first time. About 27.5% of these were positive, identifying 1,937 new cases. That’s the third time within six days the state reported fewer than 2,000 new cases.

It’s also the seventh day in a row with fewer than 3,000 new cases, and the sixth time in 7 days the positivity rate was below 30%.

The 7-day average fell from 2,320 a day Friday to 2,161 cases per day.

With the 128 new deaths, the 7-day average jumped to 42 from Friday’s average of 29. The death rate slightly increased from 1.03% to 1.05%.

As of Friday, the Wisconsin DHS reports 213,056 total doses of COVID-19 vaccines have been administered since December 14. That’s 17,904 more “shots in the arm” of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine than the state’s update on Thursday afternoon. Totals are preliminary and at least a day behind while the state reviews information from vaccinators. State graphs indicate the record was set on Wednesday [updated for clarification]. By our calculations, vaccinators averaged 11,397 shots a day over the past 7 days.

The DHS reports 30,805 people have finished their vaccination series -- that is, received their second dose.

County-by-county case and death numbers are listed later in this article.

The DHS also tracks results for people tested multiple times, such as health care workers or patients being treated for COVID-19. By that measure, the DHS calculates the positivity rate’s 7-day average has fallen again to 8.1%, from 8.5% on Friday. The state received a total of 16,696 results, and 1,377 were positive. These numbers are preliminary and always at least a day behind the DHS daily summary; they include negative tests undergoing further review. Reporting one test per person, no matter how many times they’re tested, is considered a better indicator of the virus’s spread in the community and is how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention compiles its own reports.

In addition, the DHS reported 103 people were hospitalized for serious COVID-19 symptoms in the last 24-hour period ending Saturday morning. 23,026 people have been hospitalized in Wisconsin since this virus reached our state, or 4.4% of all known cases.

To date, almost 3 million people in Wisconsin (2,952,914) have been tested. The state identified 520,188 cases, and 487,754 of these people (93.8%) are considered recovered (though may still have lingering effects from their infections. There are 26,823 active cases (5.2%) diagnosed or experiencing symptoms in the past 30 days who haven’t been medically cleared.

Phase 1b

The DHS is now accepting public comments on recommendations for who should receive the COVID-19 vaccine in the next round, known as phase 1b. A DHS subcommittee recommended three broad groups: People over 70, people in congregate settings (such as jails, homeless shelters, and employer housing) that weren’t included in phase 1a, and more essential workers (including educators in face-to-face learning and first responders and health care workers who weren’t included in phase 1a). The plan covers 1 in 5 people in Wisconsin. Read details of the recommendations and how to submit public comments HERE.

You can see a graph of vaccinations per day by county or Healthcare Emergency Readiness Coalition (HERC) at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/vaccine-data.htm#day (use the pulldown menu at the upper right corner of the graph). Keep in mind these numbers are preliminary until undergoing a few days of review.

Hospitalizations

The Wisconsin Hospital Association (WHA) reported 911 COVID-19 patients, including 212 in ICU, are currently being treated in hospitals in the state. That’s 15 fewer patients in ICU and 42 fewer patients overall compared to Friday -- and it marks the fifth time in 7 days there were fewer than 1,000 current hospitalizations.

Fox Valley region hospitals were treating 62 COVID-19 patients, including 3 in ICU.

Northeast region hospitals were treating 89 COVID-19 patients, with 28 in ICU – two fewer ICU patients and three fewer patients overall in the past day.

Daily changes in hospitalization numbers take discharges, deaths and new admissions into account.

On Saturday, the alternate care facility at State Fair Park had no patients receiving outpatient Bamlanivimab infusion therapy, a decrease from Friday’s report of three. It also didn’t have any overflow COVID-19 patients from state hospitals.

Hospital Readiness

The WHA reports Saturday the state’s 134 hospitals have 256 of their 1,466 ICU beds open (17.46%) and 2,036 of all types of medical beds (18.22%) open -- ICU, intermediate care, medical surgical and negative flow isolation.

The Fox Valley region’s 13 hospitals had 22 ICU beds (21.15%) and 141 medical beds total (16.52%) open for the eight counties they serve.

The Northeast region’s 10 hospitals had 47 ICU beds (22.7%) and 259 of all medical beds (27.09%) open for patients in seven counties. The hospitals had no intermediate care beds available.

These beds are for all patients, not just COVID-19, and whether a bed can be filled depends on whether the hospital has the necessary medical and support staff.

SATURDAY’S COUNTY CASE NUMBERS (Counties with new cases or deaths are indicated in bold) *

Wisconsin

  • Adams – 1,424 cases (+5) (11 deaths)
  • Ashland – 1,079 cases (+2) (16 deaths)
  • Barron – 4,861 cases (+21) (64 deaths) (+1)
  • Bayfield - 995 cases (+9) (18 deaths)
  • Brown – 28,224 cases (+108) (178 deaths) (+4)
  • Buffalo – 1,171 cases (+12) (7 deaths)
  • Burnett – 1,057 cases (+2) (23 deaths) (+2)
  • Calumet – 5,023 cases (+31) (38 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 6,484 cases (+30) (72 deaths)
  • Clark – 2,981 cases (+10) (54 deaths)
  • Columbia – 4,576 cases (+21) (37 deaths) (+1)
  • Crawford – 1,616 cases (+2) (13 deaths)
  • Dane – 36,297 cases (+169) (218 deaths)
  • Dodge – 10,899 cases (+27) (129 deaths)
  • Door – 2,269 cases (+10) (16 deaths)
  • Douglas – 3,361 cases (+14) (17 deaths)
  • Dunn – 3,822 cases (+10) (25 deaths)
  • Eau Claire – 10,059 cases (+37) (92 deaths) (+1)
  • Florence - 411 cases (+2) (12 deaths)
  • Fond du Lac – 11,160 cases (+27) (73 deaths) (+2)
  • Forest - 893 cases (22 deaths)
  • Grant – 4,325 cases (+11) (77 deaths)
  • Green – 2,535 cases (+9) (10 deaths)
  • Green Lake - 1,441 cases (+6) (14 deaths)
  • Iowa - 1,757 cases (+5) (8 deaths)
  • Iron - 445 cases (+5) (19 deaths)
  • Jackson - 2,489 cases (+2) (20 deaths) (+1)
  • Jefferson – 7,208 cases (+26) (63 deaths) (+1)
  • Juneau - 2,768 cases (+20) (13 deaths)
  • Kenosha – 13,640 cases (+68) (248 deaths)
  • Kewaunee – 2,235 cases (+16) (26 deaths) (+1)
  • La Crosse – 11,005 cases (+45) (67 deaths) (+2)
  • Lafayette - 1,324 cases (+11) (7 deaths) (+1)
  • Langlade - 1,868 cases (State revised, decrease of 1) (30 deaths)
  • Lincoln – 2,698 cases (+17) (51 deaths) (+1)
  • Manitowoc – 6,643 cases (+32) (57 deaths) (+1)
  • Marathon – 12,833 cases (+36) (167 deaths) (+1)
  • Marinette - 3,781 cases (+23) (55 deaths) (+1)
  • Marquette – 1,211 cases (+3) (20 deaths)
  • Menominee - 770 cases (+1) (11 deaths)
  • Milwaukee – 91,270 (+246) (1,082 deaths) (+73)
  • Monroe – 3,828 cases (+31) (27 deaths)
  • Oconto – 4,045 cases (+10) (43 deaths) (+1)
  • Oneida - 3,008 cases (+7) (49 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 17,573 cases (+76) (169 deaths) (+2)
  • Ozaukee - 6,990 cases (+40) (63 deaths) (+2)
  • Pepin – 751 cases (+1) (6 deaths)
  • Pierce – 3,178 cases (+10) (32 deaths)
  • Polk – 3,376 cases (+20) (30 deaths)
  • Portage – 5,899 cases (+8) (57 deaths)
  • Price – 1,004 cases (+2) (6 deaths)
  • Racine – 19,046 cases (+72) (276 deaths) (+1)
  • Richland - 1,185 cases (+5) (13 deaths)
  • Rock – 13,162 cases (+39) (129 deaths) (+1)
  • Rusk - 1,187 cases (+4) (14 deaths)
  • Sauk – 4,855 cases (+16) (34 deaths) (+3)
  • Sawyer - 1,329 cases (+15) (17 deaths)
  • Shawano – 4,384 cases (+8) (64 deaths) (+1)
  • Sheboygan – 12,118 cases (+41) (108 deaths) (+1)
  • St. Croix – 5,818 cases (+22) (35 deaths) (+1)
  • Taylor - 1,693 cases (+4) (19 deaths) (+4)
  • Trempealeau – 3,178 cases (+21) (33 deaths) (+1)
  • Vernon – 1,654 cases (+3) (32 deaths)
  • Vilas - 1,799 cases (+12) (31 deaths)
  • Walworth – 8,301 cases (+16) (114 deaths) (+5)
  • Washburn – 1,148 cases (+8) (15 deaths)
  • Washington – 12,785 cases (+68) (108 deaths)
  • Waukesha – 37,509 cases (+166) (392 deaths) (+9)
  • Waupaca – 4,394 cases (+11) (102 deaths)
  • Waushara – 1,993 cases (+3) (24 deaths) (+1)
  • Winnebago – 16,013 cases (+55) (165 deaths) (+1)
  • Wood – 6,077 cases (+11) (63 deaths) (+2)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula **

  • Alger - 224 cases (1 death)
  • Baraga - 479 cases (29 deaths)
  • Chippewa - 664 cases (16 deaths)
  • Delta – 2,570 cases (60 deaths)
  • Dickinson - 2,056 cases (56 deaths)
  • Gogebic - 769 cases (16 deaths)
  • Houghton – 1,832 cases (27 deaths)
  • Iron – 819 cases (32 deaths)
  • Keweenaw – 91 cases (1 death)
  • Luce – 128 cases
  • Mackinac - 270 cases (3 deaths)
  • Marquette - 3,316 cases (52 deaths)
  • Menominee - 1,547 cases (34 deaths)
  • Ontonagon – 288 cases (15 deaths)
  • Schoolcraft - 223 cases (3 deaths)

* Cases and deaths are from the daily DHS COVID-19 reports, which may differ from local health department numbers. The DHS reports cases from all health departments within a county’s boundaries, including tribal, municipal and county health departments; county websites may not. Also, public health departments update their data at various times, whereas the DHS freezes the numbers it receives by the same time every day to compile the afternoon report.

The DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their death. Most of the people severely affected by the coronavirus have underlying illnesses or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or obesity, which raises a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19. They would’ve lived longer if not for their infection. The state may revise case and death numbers after further review, such as the victim’s residence, duplicated records, or a correction in lab results. Details can be found on the DHS website and Frequently Asked Questions.

**The state of Michigan does not update numbers on Sundays. Monday’s numbers include updates since Saturday’s reporting deadline.

COVID-19 Tracing App

Wisconsin’s COVID-19 tracing app, “Wisconsin Exposure Notification,” is available for iOS and Android smartphones. No download is required for iPhones. The Android app is available on Google Play. When two phones with the app (and presumably their owners) are close enough, for long enough, they’ll anonymously share a random string of numbers via Bluetooth. If someone tests positive for the coronavirus, they’ll receive a code to type into the app. If your phones “pinged” each other in the last 14 days, you’ll receive a push notification that you are at risk of exposure. The app doesn’t collect personal information or location information, so you won’t know from whom or where, but you will be told what day the exposure might have occurred so that you can quarantine for the appropriate amount of time.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it.
  • Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments

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