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Fewer than 1,500 new coronavirus cases identified; under 5,500 tests

Published: Jan. 11, 2021 at 2:03 PM CST|Updated: Jan. 11, 2021 at 2:33 PM CST
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MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – With 50% of Wisconsin’s population tested at least once for the coronavirus, the number of people getting tested for the first time is small. The Wisconsin Department of Health Services received fewer than 5,500 results (5,454) from people being tested or testing positive for the first time. The state identified 1,456 new cases, which is 26.7% of those tests, with the remaining 3,998 showing negative. New cases were identified in 65 of Wisconsin’s 72 counties.

This is 23rd time in the last 30 days the state received less than 10,000 test results and the fifth time less than 1,500 were positive. Wisconsin is averaging 2,915 cases a day over the past 7 days, a slight increase from 2,908.

The state reported 5 deaths, the second day in a row it was in single digits, though we caution death tallies are typically lower on Sundays and Mondays than other days of the week. Wisconsin’s COVID-19 death toll crept up to 5,162. It’s the 9th time the count was in the single digits in the past 30 days. The 7-day average held steady at 40 deaths per day.

The deaths were reported in Lafayette, Sauk, Shawano, Vilas and Wood counties.

County-by-county case and death numbers appear later in this article.

In addition to the official daily numbers, the DHS reports results for people tested multiple times*, such as health care workers or patients being treated for COVID-19. By these measures, the DHS received 11,566 results Sunday, including 1,182 that were positive, and the 7-day positivity rate declined for a fifth day to 10.0%, the lowest since December 30 (see explanation below).

Wisconsin is getting ready to move on to the next phase of COVID-19 vaccinations. In a statement, the Department of Health Services announced police officers and firefighters will be eligible for vaccinations starting next Monday, Jan. 18 (related story here) as a start to Phase 1B. Some EMS workers have been vaccinated under the definition of frontline health care worker in Phase 1A.

Gov. Tony Evers said a committee that advises the DHS will make recommendations for who else is eligible for the next phase and release them for public comments this Wednesday (see related story). He’s asked the federal government to increase its distribution of doses to Wisconsin.

So far, a total 2,914,080 people have been tested for the COVID-19 virus, which is equivalent to 50.05% of Wisconsin’s population. The DHS says 2,405,734 tested negative.

Of the 508,346 who tested positive, 1.02% have died -- a death rate that’s held steady for 6 days after rising; 93.4% (474,830) are considered recovered; and 5.6% (28,218) are still active cases, meaning it’s been less than 30 days since they were diagnosed or noticed symptoms and haven’t been medically cleared.

Hospitalizations

The DHS reported 56 new COVID-19 hospitalizations in the past 24-hour period. The 7-day average edged up to 122 patients a day.

The Wisconsin Hospital Association (WHA) reported there were 1,017 COVID-19 patients hospitalized across the state Monday, 18 more than Sunday when it reached a 3-month low, but 105 fewer than a week ago. The WHA says 221 of these patients are in intensive care units. Daily changes in hospitalizations take deaths, discharges and new admissions into account.

The Fox Valley region’s 13 hospitals were treating 76 COVID-19 patients, including 7 in ICU.

The Northeast region’s 10 hospitals were treating 99 COVID-19 patients, with 28 in ICU.

The alternate care facility at State Fair Park again wasn’t treating any overflow patients for hospitals in the state, but Monday there were three people receiving Bamlanivimab infusion therapy there on an outpatient basis.

Hospital Readiness

The WHA further reported Monday 296 ICU beds (20.2%) and 2,182 of all types of medical beds (19.5%) -- ICU, intermediate care, medical surgical and negative flow isolation -- were open in the state’s 134 hospitals. These beds are for all patients, not just COVID-19, and whether a bed can be filled depends on whether the hospital has the necessary medical and support staff.

The Fox Valley region had 23 ICU beds (22.1%) and 92 medical beds total (15.2%) open among them for the eight counties they serve.

The Northeast region had 27 ICU beds (13.0%) and 199 of all medical beds (20.8%) open for people in seven counties.

MONDAY’S COUNTY CASE NUMBERS (Counties with new cases or deaths are indicated in bold) **

Wisconsin

  • Adams – 1,393 cases (+11) (11 deaths)
  • Ashland – 1,061 cases (+7) (16 deaths)
  • Barron – 4,737 cases (+13) (58 deaths)
  • Bayfield - 974 cases (+7) (18 deaths)
  • Brown – 27,542 cases (+7) (168 deaths)
  • Buffalo – 1,092 cases (+6) (7 deaths)
  • Burnett – 1,039 cases (+6) (21 deaths)
  • Calumet – 4,918 cases (+18) (37 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 6,295 cases (+31) (70 deaths)
  • Clark – 2,924 cases (+7) (54 deaths)
  • Columbia – 4,475 cases (+16) (33 deaths)
  • Crawford – 1,594 cases (13 deaths)
  • Dane – 35,526 cases (+135) (211 deaths)
  • Dodge – 10,724 cases (+24) (126 deaths)
  • Door – 2,170 cases (+2) (15 deaths)
  • Douglas – 3,279 cases (+16) (17 deaths)
  • Dunn – 3,716 cases (+4) (25 deaths)
  • Eau Claire – 9,809 cases (+20) (87 deaths)
  • Florence - 409 cases (+1) (12 deaths)
  • Fond du Lac – 10,983 cases (+22) (71 deaths)
  • Forest - 888 cases (+2) (22 deaths)
  • Grant – 4,263 cases (+3) (77 deaths)
  • Green – 2,459 cases (+4) (10 deaths)
  • Green Lake - 1,425 cases (14 deaths)
  • Iowa - 1,728 cases (8 deaths)
  • Iron - 434 cases (18 deaths)
  • Jackson - 2,468 cases (+1) (18 deaths)
  • Jefferson – 7,066 cases (+33) (60 deaths)
  • Juneau - 2,685 cases (+10) (11 deaths)
  • Kenosha – 13,110 cases (+6) (241 deaths)
  • Kewaunee – 2,172 cases (24 deaths)
  • La Crosse – 10,775 cases (+58) (63 deaths)
  • Lafayette - 1,296 cases (+6) (6 deaths) (+1)
  • Langlade - 1,840 cases (30 deaths)
  • Lincoln – 2,652 cases (+9) (49 deaths)
  • Manitowoc – 6,491 cases (+30) (55 deaths)
  • Marathon – 12,561 cases (+34) (161 deaths)
  • Marinette - 3,697 cases (+15) (51 deaths)
  • Marquette – 1,198 cases (+3) (20 deaths)
  • Menominee - 750 cases (+1) (10 deaths)
  • Milwaukee – 89,157 (+218) (995 deaths)
  • Monroe – 3,712 cases (+18) (25 deaths)
  • Oconto – 3,979 cases (+11) (41 deaths)
  • Oneida - 2,956 cases (+12) (47 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 17,146 cases (+49) (164 deaths)
  • Ozaukee - 6,730 cases (+17) (58 deaths)
  • Pepin – 723 cases (+2) (6 deaths)
  • Pierce – 3,118 cases (+7) (30 deaths)
  • Polk – 3,278 cases (+9) (29 deaths)
  • Portage – 5,819 cases (+10) (54 deaths)
  • Price – 983 cases (+2) (6 deaths)
  • Racine – 18,636 cases (+39) (268 deaths)
  • Richland - 1,171 cases (+2) (13 deaths)
  • Rock – 12,847 cases (+50) (122 deaths)
  • Rusk - 1,162 cases (+4) (14 deaths)
  • Sauk – 4,760 cases (+18) (32 deaths) (+1)
  • Sawyer - 1,295 cases (+2) (17 deaths)
  • Shawano – 4,320 cases (+5) (61 deaths) (+1)
  • Sheboygan – 11,900 cases (+58) (96 deaths)
  • St. Croix – 5,704 cases (+16) (32 deaths)
  • Taylor - 1,660 cases (+12) (14 deaths)
  • Trempealeau – 3,123 cases (+10) (30 deaths)
  • Vernon – 1,635 cases (+4) (32 deaths)
  • Vilas - 1,738 cases (+20) (28 deaths) (+1)
  • Walworth – 8,118 cases (+25) (105 deaths)
  • Washburn – 1,104 cases (+7) (15 deaths)
  • Washington – 12,424 cases (+22) (103 deaths)
  • Waukesha – 36,535 cases (+173) (373 deaths)
  • Waupaca – 4,325 cases (+11) (100 deaths)
  • Waushara – 1,963 cases (20 deaths) (cases revised -1 by state)
  • Winnebago – 15,744 cases (+46) (159 deaths)
  • Wood – 5,963 cases (+10) (55 deaths) (+1)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula (adds Saturday-Monday data) ***

  • Alger - 211 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Baraga - 476 cases (29 deaths)
  • Chippewa - 652 cases (+5) (13 deaths)
  • Delta – 2,550 cases (+6) (60 deaths)
  • Dickinson - 2,048 cases (+1) (56 deaths)
  • Gogebic - 745 cases (+8) (16 deaths)
  • Houghton – 1,755 cases (+21) (27 deaths)
  • Iron – 799 cases (+7) (32 deaths)
  • Keweenaw – 83 cases (1 death)
  • Luce – 127 cases
  • Mackinac - 269 cases (3 deaths)
  • Marquette - 3,270 cases (+17) (51 deaths)
  • Menominee - 1,533 cases (+3) (30 deaths)
  • Ontonagon – 282 cases (15 deaths)
  • Schoolcraft - 223 cases (+3) (3 deaths)

** Cases and deaths are from the daily DHS COVID-19 reports, which may differ from local health department numbers. The DHS reports cases from all health departments within a county’s boundaries, including tribal, municipal and county health departments; county websites may not. Also, public health departments update their data at various times, whereas the DHS freezes the numbers it receives by the same time every day to compile the afternoon report.

The DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their death. Most of the people severely affected by the coronavirus have underlying illnesses or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or obesity, which raises a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19. They would’ve lived longer if not for their infection. The state may revise case and death numbers after further review, such as the victim’s residence, duplicated records, or a correction in lab results. Details can be found on the DHS website and Frequently Asked Questions.

***The state of Michigan does not update numbers on Sundays. Monday’s numbers include updates since Saturday’s reporting deadline.

Testing

*Results for people tested multiple times are very preliminary and always at least a day behind the official DHS daily summary; they include negative tests undergoing further review and take about two weeks to finalize. We emphasize that reporting one result per person rather than multiple tests is considered a better indicator of the virus’s spread in the community and is how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention compiles its own reports.

COVID-19 Tracing App

Wisconsin’s COVID-19 tracing app, “Wisconsin Exposure Notification,” is available for iOS and Android smartphones. No download is required for iPhones. The Android app is available on Google Play. When two phones with the app (and presumably their owners) are close enough, for long enough, they’ll anonymously share a random string of numbers via Bluetooth. If someone tests positive for the coronavirus, they’ll receive a code to type into the app. If your phones “pinged” each other in the last 14 days, you’ll receive a push notification that you are at risk of exposure. The app doesn’t collect personal information or location information, so you won’t know from whom or where, but you will be told what day the exposure might have occurred so that you can quarantine for the appropriate amount of time.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it.
  • Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments

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