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Coronavirus in Wisconsin: 3,791 new cases, 40 more deaths

Wisconsin should cross half a million confirmed cases on Friday
Published: Jan. 7, 2021 at 2:03 PM CST|Updated: Jan. 7, 2021 at 4:25 PM CST
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MADISON Wis. (WBAY) – The Wisconsin Department of Health Services says coronavirus testing confirmed 3,791 new cases in its report Thursday, the most in 7 days. Wisconsin is fewer than 1,500 positive tests away from half a million confirmed coronavirus cases. That will likely happen Friday as the state is averaging 2,491 cases a day over the past week.

The state received 10,148 results for people tested or testing positive for the coronavirus for the first time. The state hadn’t received more than 10,000 results since Christmas Eve -- and this was only the 10th time in the past 30 days.

A total 2,881,948 people have now been tested for the virus that causes COVID-19, equivalent to 49.5% of the state’s population. Out of those, 2,383,410 have tested negative, including 6,357 of the results received by Thursday morning’s deadline.

Forty more deaths were added to the state’s count in the last 24 hours. Wisconsin’s COVID-19 death toll is now 5,079 after crossing the 5,000 mark Wednesday. The 7-day average is 31 deaths per day. The death rate held steady from Wednesday at 1.02%.

The deaths were reported in Calumet, Crawford, Dane (13), Door, Eau Claire (3), Kenosha (3), La Crosse (2), Marinette, Milwaukee (2), Ozaukee, Polk (2), Sauk, Sawyer (2), Walworth, Washington (2), Waukesha (3), and Winnebago counties.

County cases and deaths appear later in this article.

The percentage of active cases grew to 5.8% of all known cases since last February, or 28,880 people, while 93.2%, or 464,443 people, are considered recovered. Recovery means it’s been more than 30 days since they were diagnosed or the onset of symptoms or they’ve been medically cleared; some may still feel lingering effects of their infection.

In a health briefing Thursday, Health Secretary-designee Andrea Palm said about 105,000 people have received their first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, and 5,000 of them also received their second dose. The state is averaging about 4,773 vaccinations per day since the first shots were given on December 15.

Palm reiterated that everyone in Wisconsin who wants to be vaccinated will get the vaccine, but it may take several months. Wisconsin is still in what’s called “Phase 1A” of the vaccinations, focusing on health care workers and the residents and staff at nursing homes and senior living facilities. Some EMS crews and essential frontline workers are also getting the vaccine. Palm emphasized continuing to wear face masks and keep a social distance, saying, “It will be months before we can return to normal habits.”

Hospitalizations

The DHS reports 99 more people were hospitalized for COVID-19 in the last day, back in double digits (though barely) after two days with 216 and 175 hospitalizations. The state is averaging 103 hospitalizations per day over the last week.

The Wisconsin Hospital Association (WHA) reported Thursday there were 1,077 COVID-19 patients hospitalized, including 244 in intensive care.

Hospitalized24-hr changeICU24-hr change
Statewide1,077-51244+1
Fox Valley region
(8 counties, 13 hospitals)
55-65-1
Northeast region
(7 counties, 10 hospitals)
95-1022+0

Daily changes in hospital figures take new admissions, discharges and deaths into account.

The alternate care facility at State Fair Park wasn’t handling any overflow patients for hospitals in the state but had 3 patients in for outpatient Bamlanivimab infusion therapy. The field hospital was established in October to take patients who are close to discharge but still need some care, such as oxygen treatments.

Hospital Readiness

In Thursday’s update, the Wisconsin Hospital Association (WHA) reported 208 ICU beds (14.2%) and 1,858 of all types of medical beds (22.6%) -- ICU, intermediate care, medical surgical and negative flow isolation -- were open in the state’s 134 hospitals. These beds are for all patients, not just COVID-19, and whether a bed can be filled depends on whether the hospital has the necessary medical and support staff.

The Fox Valley region’s 13 hospitals had 11 ICU beds (10.6%) and 104 of all medical beds (12.2%) open among them in the eight counties they serve.

The Northeast region’s 10 hospitals had 18 ICU beds (8.7%) and 182 of all medical beds (19.0%) open for people in seven counties.

Testing

In addition to the official daily numbers, the DHS reports results for people tested multiple times, such as health care workers or patients being treated for COVID-19. By these measures, the DHS received 29,607 results Wednesday, including 2,976 that were positive, and the 7-day positivity rate dipped slightly to 11.4% from 11.6%. These results are very preliminary and at least a day behind the official state reporting; they include negative tests undergoing further review and take about two weeks to finalize. We emphasize that reporting one result per person rather than multiple tests is considered a better indicator of the virus’s spread in the community and is how the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention compiles its own reports.

Palm says the state’s COVID-19 contact tracing app has been downloaded one million times since it debuted for iOS and Android mobile devices two weeks ago. When two devices that have the app installed are close enough for long enough, they share a string of random numbers. When a person tests positive for the coronavirus, they can enter a code to anonymously notify people whose mobile devices have a match (see related story).

THURSDAY’S COUNTY CASE NUMBERS (Counties with new cases or deaths are indicated in bold)*

Wisconsin

  • Adams – 1,356 cases (+10) (11 deaths)
  • Ashland – 1,036 cases (+6) (16 deaths)
  • Barron – 4,629 cases (+44) (58 deaths)
  • Bayfield - 951 cases (+2) (18 deaths)
  • Brown – 27,148 cases (+160) (167 deaths)
  • Buffalo – 1,054 cases (+13) (7 deaths)
  • Burnett – 1,020 cases (+4) (21 deaths)
  • Calumet – 4,809 cases (+32) (36 deaths) (+1)
  • Chippewa – 6,093 cases (+26) (67 deaths)
  • Clark – 2,886 cases (+20) (53 deaths)
  • Columbia – 4,381 cases (+39) (33 deaths)
  • Crawford – 1,578 cases (+9) (13 deaths) (+1)
  • Dane – 34,723 cases (+386) (203 deaths) (+13)
  • Dodge – 10,598 cases (+52) (126 deaths)
  • Door – 2,134 cases (+32) (15 deaths) (+1)
  • Douglas – 3,209 cases (+25) (17 deaths)
  • Dunn – 3,652 cases (+18) (24 deaths)
  • Eau Claire – 9,630 cases (+82) (83 deaths) (+3)
  • Florence - 407 cases (+1) (12 deaths)
  • Fond du Lac – 10,767 cases (+82) (70 deaths)
  • Forest - 879 cases (+12) (22 deaths)
  • Grant – 4,227 cases (+26) (77 deaths)
  • Green – 2,405 cases (+11) (11 deaths)
  • Green Lake - 1,415 cases (+7) (10 deaths)
  • Iowa - 1,714 cases (+5) (8 deaths)
  • Iron - 427 cases (+2) (18 deaths)
  • Jackson - 2,439 cases (+10) (18 deaths)
  • Jefferson – 6,860 cases (+27) (59 deaths)
  • Juneau - 2,590 cases (+17) (10 deaths)
  • Kenosha – 12,849 cases (+75) (232 deaths) (+3)
  • Kewaunee – 2,139 cases (+19) (24 deaths)
  • La Crosse – 10,545 cases (+63) (63 deaths) (+2)
  • Lafayette - 1,264 cases (+2) (5 deaths)
  • Langlade - 1,830 cases (+11) (30 deaths)
  • Lincoln – 2,569 cases (+20) (49 deaths)
  • Manitowoc – 6,300 cases (+55) (51 deaths)
  • Marathon – 12,349 cases (+74) (161 deaths)
  • Marinette - 3,621 cases (+27) (51 deaths) (+1)
  • Marquette – 1,188 cases (+10) (18 deaths)
  • Menominee - 741 cases (+6) (10 deaths)
  • Milwaukee – 87,736 (+592) (993 deaths) (+2)
  • Monroe – 3,621 cases (+28) (25 deaths)
  • Oconto – 3,900 cases (+28) (41 deaths)
  • Oneida - 2,878 cases (+9) (47 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 16,679 cases (+167) (164 deaths)
  • Ozaukee - 6,595 cases (+70) (58 deaths) (+1)
  • Pepin – 697 cases (+6) (6 deaths)
  • Pierce – 3,054 cases (+41) (30 deaths)
  • Polk – 3,187 cases (+20) (25 deaths) (+2)
  • Portage – 5,736 cases (+36) (53 deaths)
  • Price – 970 cases (+5) (5 deaths)
  • Racine – 18,319 cases (+151) (266 deaths)
  • Richland - 1,148 cases (+17) (13 deaths)
  • Rock – 12,573 cases (+73) (119 deaths)
  • Rusk - 1,143 cases (+18) (14 deaths)
  • Sauk – 4,626 cases (+24) (31 deaths) (+1)
  • Sawyer - 1,273 cases (+11) (14 deaths) (+2)
  • Shawano – 4,275 cases (+23) (59 deaths)
  • Sheboygan – 11,665 cases (+56) (96 deaths)
  • St. Croix – 5,608 cases (+48) (28 deaths)
  • Taylor - 1,626 cases (+10) (14 deaths)
  • Trempealeau – 3,074 cases (+16) (30 deaths)
  • Vernon – 1,607 cases (+25) (30 deaths)
  • Vilas - 1,667 cases (+19) (21 deaths)
  • Walworth – 7,945 cases (+55) (104 deaths) (+1)
  • Washburn – 1,070 cases (+8) (15 deaths)
  • Washington – 12,194 cases (+134) (102 deaths) (+2)
  • Waukesha – 35,778 cases (+465) (369 deaths) (+3)
  • Waupaca – 4,233 cases (+21) (99 deaths)
  • Waushara – 1,938 cases (+3) (19 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 15,471 cases (+67) (158 deaths) (+1)
  • Wood – 5,840 cases (+23) (54 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula **

  • Alger - 201 cases (1 death) (cases revised -1 by state)
  • Baraga - 476 cases (29 deaths)
  • Chippewa - 628 cases (+4) (13 deaths)
  • Delta – 2,532 cases (+4) (60 deaths)
  • Dickinson - 2,037 cases (56 deaths)
  • Gogebic - 725 cases (+4) (16 deaths)
  • Houghton – 1,687 cases (+29) (27 deaths)
  • Iron – 785 cases (+3) (32 deaths)
  • Keweenaw – 81 cases (+4) (1 death)
  • Luce – 127 cases
  • Mackinac - 267 cases (3 deaths)
  • Marquette - 3,213 cases (+13) (51 deaths)
  • Menominee - 1,511 cases (+2) (27 deaths) (+1)
  • Ontonagon – 279 cases (+1) (15 deaths)
  • Schoolcraft - 219 cases (+2) (3 deaths)

* Cases and deaths are from the daily DHS COVID-19 reports, which may differ from local health department numbers. The DHS reports cases from all health departments within a county’s boundaries, including tribal, municipal and county health departments; county websites may not. Also, public health departments update their data at various times, whereas the DHS freezes the numbers it receives by the same time every day to compile the afternoon report.

The DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their death. Most of the people severely affected by the coronavirus have underlying illnesses or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or obesity, which raises a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19. They would’ve lived longer if not for their infection. The state may revise case and death numbers after further review, such as the victim’s residence, duplicated records, or a correction in lab results. Details can be found on the DHS website and Frequently Asked Questions.

**The state of Michigan does not update numbers on Sundays. Monday’s numbers include updates since Saturday’s reporting deadline.

COVID-19 Tracing App

Wisconsin’s COVID-19 tracing app, “Wisconsin Exposure Notification,” is available for iOS and Android smartphones. No download is required for iPhones. The Android app is available on Google Play. When two phones with the app (and presumably their owners) are close enough, for long enough, they’ll anonymously share a random string of numbers via Bluetooth. If someone tests positive for the coronavirus, they’ll receive a code to type into the app. If your phones “pinged” each other in the last 14 days, you’ll receive a push notification that you are at risk of exposure. The app doesn’t collect personal information or location information, so you won’t know from whom or where, but you will be told what day the exposure might have occurred so that you can quarantine for the appropriate amount of time.

COVID-19 Home Testing

Gov. Tony Evers announced at-home COVID-19 testing kits will be made available -- for free -- to anyone who wants them. A person can test themselves or family members, even if they don’t have symptoms, then send it to a lab for testing. The Vault Medical Services kit is the first saliva test to get emergency-use authorization from the FDA and normally costs $119. CLICK HERE for details and a link to request a test kit.

COVID-19 Vaccine

As of Tuesday, December 29, the state says 47,157 COVID-19 vaccines out of the 156,875 vaccines shipped have been administered. The state started giving out the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine on Dec. 14th, with 40,850 of them being administered so far. Moderna vaccinations started Dec. 22nd, and 6,306 of them have been administered. In addition, 29,000 doses will be allocated to vaccinating residents and staff members at long-term care facilities. The state is updating vaccine information at dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/vaccine.htm.

RELATED: Wisconsin starts vaccinating residents, staff in long-term care facilities with help of CVS Health

Wisconsin has also launched a COVID-19 vaccine data page that tracks the number of shots given out and shipped to the state. TRACK STATEWIDE VACCINE DATA HERE: https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/vaccine-data.htm

RELATED: Wisconsin launches COVID vaccine data page

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments

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