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Coronavirus in Wisconsin: 2,155 new cases, 19 more deaths

Published: Dec. 7, 2020 at 2:10 PM CST|Updated: Dec. 7, 2020 at 2:43 PM CST
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MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – Coronavirus testing delivered good and bad news for the pandemic in Wisconsin.

The state Department of Health Services reported 2,155 new coronavirus cases Monday -- falling that low for the first time since early October, aside from the outlying 1,300 positive tests the day after Thanksgiving. The new cases are based on 7,906 total test results -- and you have to go back to September 28 for a day with fewer results. The remaining 5,751 results were negative.

27.26% of the results were positive, putting the positivity rate below 30% for the fourth time in two weeks -- and the second time in two days. New cases were reported in 68 of Wisconsin’s 72 counties, with Juneau, Menominee, Rusk and Waushara counties the exceptions.

The 7-day average for new cases declined for a third day to 3,871, down from peaking in the 6000′s three weeks ago. Tuesday and Wednesday will be crucial to show how the state is doing in the pandemic fight, as the state typically receives fewer test results on Mondays.

Nineteen more COVID-19 deaths were reported by the DHS Monday, bringing the state’s death toll to 3,738. The death rate remained 0.90% for a fourth day, after rising last week, and the 7-day average climbed to 61 deaths per day.

The deaths were in Brown, Florence, Green, Jefferson, Kewaunee, Lafayette, Marathon (5), Marinette, Portage, Vilas (2), Waukesha (3) and Waushara counties.

County case numbers are listed later in this article.

Very soon, more people in Wisconsin will have died from COVID-19 in 10 months than died in all types of accidents in 2018, such as traffic crashes and household accidents, making COVID-19 comparable to the third-leading cause of death in Wisconsin. That’s based on the most recent ranked data available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The DHS says more than 350,000 people (352,510) diagnosed with the COVID-19 virus since February are considered recovered -- meaning 30 days has passed since their diagnosis or they were medically cleared. There are still 58,009 people who are considered active cases, or 14.0% of all cases ever diagnosed. That percentage fell below 15% over the weekend.

New guidelines for quarantine took effect today (Monday). The DHS says people who had close contact with someone with COVID-19 only need to quarantine for 10 days if they don’t exhibit any symptoms. They can shorten that to 7 days if they get tested and receive a negative test result within 48 hours of the end of quarantine. By using the new CDC guidance, the DHS hopes people are more likely to abide by quarantine if it’s a shorter duration. People should still monitor themselves for symptoms for a full 14 days and should immediately isolate themselves if they develop any symptoms.

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HOSPITALIZATIONS

Seventy people were hospitalized for COVID-19 treatment -- the fewest hospitalizations in one day since the day after Thanksgiving, and only the fifth time that number was below 100 since the start of November.

The 7-day average for hospitalizations remains high at 170 patients per day, though that metric was in the 200′s just two weeks ago.

In total, 18,286 people have been hospitalized for serious symptoms of COVID-19. The percentage seems to have stagnated at 4.4% of all coronavirus cases.

Currently there are 1,566 COVID-19 patients being treated in hospitals -- 64 more patients than Sunday but 279 fewer than a week ago -- according to new figures from the Wisconsin Hospital Association (WHA). Of those, 326 are in ICU.

There are 100 COVID-19 patients in the Fox Valley region’s 13 hospitals, with 17 in intensive care. There are 116 in the Northeast region’s 10 hospitals, with 25 in intensive care.

Daily changes in hospitalization numbers take deaths and discharges into account.

There were 6 patients at the alternate care facility at the state fairgrounds Monday, the same as Sunday. The field hospital is meant to help free up hospital beds by taking patients who are close to being released from the hospital but not quite ready, such as those who are ambulatory but still need oxygen.

HOSPITAL READINESS

Monday, the WHA reported 232 of the state’s 1,466 ICU beds are open (15.8%). The state’s 134 hospitals have a total 1,902 ICU, intermediate care, medical surgical and negative flow isolation beds unoccupied (17.0%). These beds are for all patients, not just COVID-19, and whether a bed can be filled depends on whether the hospital has the necessary medical and support staff.

The Fox Valley region hospitals, which serves 8 counties, have 13 ICU beds (12.5%) open and 114 medical beds (13.4%) open overall.

The Northeast region hospitals, serving 7 counties, have 26 ICU beds (12.6%) open and 196 of all types of medical beds (20.5%) open overall.

MONDAY’S COUNTY CASE NUMBERS (Counties with new cases or deaths are indicated in bold.)*

Wisconsin*

  • Adams – 1,133 cases (+4) (9 deaths)
  • Ashland – 800 cases (+3) (10 deaths)
  • Barron – 3,854 cases (+10) (47 deaths)
  • Bayfield - 753 cases (+7) (16 deaths)
  • Brown – 23,510 cases (+6) (149 deaths) (+1)
  • Buffalo – 866 cases (+2) (5 deaths)
  • Burnett – 848 cases (+4) (15 deaths)
  • Calumet – 4,233 cases (+12) (28 deaths)
  • Chippewa – 5,218 cases (+33) (55 deaths)
  • Clark – 2,344 cases (+19) (44 deaths)
  • Columbia – 3,659 cases (+13) (13 deaths)
  • Crawford – 1,395 cases (+4) (9 deaths)
  • Dane – 29,303 cases (+250) (104 deaths)
  • Dodge – 9,076 cases (+59) (83 deaths)
  • Door - 1,676 cases (+1) (11 deaths)
  • Douglas – 2,373 cases (+49) (7 deaths)
  • Dunn – 2,988 cases (+9) (15 deaths)
  • Eau Claire – 8,178 cases (+29) (63 deaths)(+1)
  • Florence - 358 cases (+6) (12 deaths)
  • Fond du Lac – 9,121 cases (+16) (53 deaths)
  • Forest - 762 cases (+6) (19 deaths)
  • Grant – 3,662 cases (+19) (65 deaths)
  • Green – 1,864 cases (+3) (6 deaths) (+1)
  • Green Lake - 1,232 cases (+4) (7 deaths)
  • Iowa - 1,380 cases (+15) (5 deaths)
  • Iron - 376 cases (+5) (10 deaths)
  • Jackson - 1,959 cases (+6) (5 deaths)
  • Jefferson – 5,725 cases (+54) (42 deaths) (+1)
  • Juneau - 2,051 cases (7 deaths)
  • Kenosha – 10,096 cases (+31) (159 deaths)
  • Kewaunee - 1,742 cases (+2) (22 deaths) (+1)
  • La Crosse – 8,706 cases (+29) (40 deaths)
  • Lafayette - 1,117 cases (+4) (4 deaths) (+1)
  • Langlade - 1,596 cases (+6) (28 deaths) (deaths revised -1 by state)
  • Lincoln – 2,074 cases (+9) (35 deaths)
  • Manitowoc – 5,244 cases (+34) (38 deaths)
  • Marathon – 10,361 cases (+78) (138 deaths) (+5)
  • Marinette - 3,145 cases (+29) (36 deaths) (+1)
  • Marquette – 1,075 cases (+4) (15 deaths)
  • Menominee - 591 cases (8 deaths)
  • Milwaukee – 73,010 (+442) (775 deaths)
  • Monroe - 2,864 cases (+18) (15 deaths)
  • Oconto – 3,306 cases (+14) (32 deaths)
  • Oneida - 2,485 cases (+6) (39 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 14,388 cases (+73) (136 deaths)
  • Ozaukee - 5,125 cases (+4) (39 deaths)
  • Pepin – 518 cases (+3) (2 deaths)
  • Pierce – 2,412 cases (+24) (19 deaths)
  • Polk – 2,441 cases (+25) (18 deaths)
  • Portage – 4,929 cases (+19) (43 deaths) (+1)
  • Price – 802 cases (+11) (4 deaths)
  • Racine – 14,859 cases (+29) (197 deaths)
  • Richland - 924 cases (+4) (13 deaths)
  • Rock – 10,119 cases (+66) (98 deaths)
  • Rusk - 958 cases (9 deaths)
  • Sauk – 3,815 cases (+20) (19 deaths)
  • Sawyer - 977 cases (+7) (8 deaths)
  • Shawano – 3,743 cases (+2) (49 deaths)
  • Sheboygan – 9,646 cases (+38) (66 deaths)
  • St. Croix – 4,646 cases (+31) (22 deaths)
  • Taylor - 1,328 cases (+15) (11 deaths)
  • Trempealeau – 2,602 cases (+15) (21 deaths)
  • Vernon – 1,248 cases (+7) (15 deaths)
  • Vilas - 1,359 cases (+12) (15 deaths) (+2)
  • Walworth – 6,482 cases (+59) (57 deaths)
  • Washburn – 802 cases (+13) (5 deaths)
  • Washington – 9,612 cases (+13) (77 deaths)
  • Waukesha – 28,454 cases (+231) (235 deaths) (+3)
  • Waupaca – 3,806 cases (+7) (91 deaths)
  • Waushara – 1,786 cases (cases revised -1 by state) (12 deaths) (+1)
  • Winnebago – 13,744 cases (+56) (127 deaths)
  • Wood – 4,698 cases (+18) (32 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula **

  • Alger - 169 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Baraga - 427 cases (+3) (24 deaths)
  • Chippewa - 408 cases (+4) (6 deaths)
  • Delta – 2,319 cases (+16) (53 deaths) (+1)
  • Dickinson - 1,786 cases (+18) (46 deaths)
  • Gogebic - 627 cases (+7) (11 deaths)
  • Houghton – 1,389 cases (+18) (13 deaths) (deaths revised -1 by state)
  • Iron – 718 cases (+3) (31 deaths)
  • Keweenaw – 64 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Luce – 121 cases (cases revised -1 by state)
  • Mackinac - 235 cases (+4) (1 death)
  • Marquette - 2,837 cases (+53) (35 deaths) (+2)
  • Menominee - 1,273 cases (+13) (19 deaths)
  • Ontonagon – 266 cases (+2) (14 deaths)
  • Schoolcraft - 182 cases (+5) (1 death)

Earlier this week, the DHS published a new, interactive map online that shows COVID-19 virus cases and deaths by county, municipality, ZIP Code or school district (CLICK HERE). You can view cases and deaths by total numbers or per capita or deaths as a percentage of total cases. Health Secretary-designee Andrea Palm says it “offers new ways for people to understand COVID-19 activity within their communities.”

* Viewers have asked us why the state has different numbers than what’s reported on some county health department websites. The DHS reports cases from all health departments within a county’s boundaries, including tribal, municipal and county health departments; county websites may not. Also, public health departments update their data at various times whereas the DHS freezes the numbers it receives by the same time every day to compile the afternoon report.

The DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their death. Most of the people severely affected by the coronavirus have underlying illnesses or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or obesity, which raises a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19 but would’ve lived longer if not for their infection. The state may revise case and death numbers after further review, such as the victim’s residence, duplicated records, or a correction in lab results. Details can be found on the DHS website and Frequently Asked Questions.

**The state of Michigan does not update numbers on Sundays. Monday’s numbers include updates since Saturday’s reporting deadline.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

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