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Wisconsin’s 3,747 coronavirus cases sets new one-day record

24.65% of tests were positive. The state’s death toll rose by 17.
Published: Oct. 15, 2020 at 1:58 PM CDT|Updated: Oct. 15, 2020 at 4:27 PM CDT
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MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) - Wisconsin set another one-day record of 3,747 new coronavirus cases, surpassing the old record set just two days ago by 468 cases. Every county in Wisconsin reported at least one new case except Iron County, where the case number was revised.

The Department of Health Services (DHS) received 15,202 tests for the 24-hour period ending Thursday, the most test results in a day since Oct. 8. Almost 1 in 4 tests were positive (24.65%). By our measure, the positivity rate’s 7-day average is at all-time high of 21.99%.

This was the third day in a row with more than 3,000 positive tests. Wisconsin added 12,000 coronavirus cases in 4 days, a new record pace.

There have now been a total 162,325 people diagnosed with the virus. More than 1 in 5 (20.4%) of all the people were diagnosed within the past 30 days and haven’t been medically cleared. There are now 33,160 active cases and 127,576 people considered recovered.

Seventeen more people died, bringing the COVID-19 death toll to 1,553 in the state. The death rate declined to 0.96%, a new low. Deaths were reported in Brown (3), Burnett (2), Chippewa, Forest, Iowa, Lafayette, Outagamie, Portage, Waukesha (2), Waupaca, Winnebago (2) and Wood counties. Iowa and Lafayette counties reported their first COVID-19 deaths, leaving 4 counties without a COVID-19 death: Crawford, Menominee, Pepin and Price. After the state’s report, Appleton Public Health reported the city’s 18th COVID-19 related death, a patient in their 80s; the state will add that death to Outagamie County’s total in a day or two.

County case numbers are reported later in this article.

DHS reports 138 more people were hospitalized for COVID-19 in the past 24 hours, the third day in a row new hospitalizations were in triple digits.

Thursday’s update finds 1,043 patients currently hospitalized for COVID-19 treatment with 264 in intensive care units. Both are all-time highs. Hospitalization totals take deaths and discharges into account.

A total 8,892 people have been hospitalized for COVID-19 since February, or 5.5% of all confirmed cases. Wisconsin is averaging 118 COVID-19 hospitalizations a day over the past 7 days.

Statewide, 16% of all medical beds are available, including 13% of ICU beds. The Wisconsin Hospital Association (WHA) reports 163 COVID-19 patients, with 18 in ICU, in the Fox Valley region’s 13 hospitals. There are 168 COVID-19 patients, 53 in ICU, in the Northeast region’s 10 hospitals. 11.5% of ICU beds in the Fox Valley region and 10% of ICU beds in the Northeast region are reported as immediately available.

In an interview on Action 2 News This Morning, Prevea president/CEO Dr. Ashok Rai cautioned that just because a bed is empty doesn’t mean the hospital can use it, because the hospital may not have the staffing for a patient in that bed. “[The hospitals] all have situations where we’re short staffed because of COVID and we’re looking for help. So, an empty physical space is not a hospital bed, it’s the team around you who needs to take care of it.”

Here’s a snapshot of how previous 30-day periods compare, show changes from the day and the month before:

DateTotal cases24-hr change30-day changePositivityTotal deaths24-hr change30-day changeTotal hospitalized24-hr change30-day change
October 15162,325+3,747+71,02124.65%1,553+17+3338,892+138+2,486
September 1591,304+1,348+25,56310.99%1,220+10+1816,406+56+1,102
August 1665,741+685+25,23411.23%1,039+1+2065,304+29+1,273
July 1740,507+880+17,0536.56%833+24,031+63+903

Action 2 News will continue to emphasize the state’s summary statistics counting each person once no matter how many times they’re tested. This is the standard method used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in its federal reporting and is a better indication of the spread of the coronavirus in a community. For data including results for every person tested multiple times, visit the DHS website. Even by that measure, the positivity rate is climbing; the 7-day average is now at a peak of 10.6%.

THURSDAY’S COUNTY CASE NUMBERS (counties with additional cases and/or deaths are indicated in bold)*

Wisconsin

  • Adams - 340 cases (+6) (4 deaths)
  • Ashland - 210 cases (+2) (3 deaths)
  • Barron - 701 cases (+23) (6 deaths)
  • Bayfield - 166 cases (+5) (1 death)
  • Brown - 12,519 cases (+299) (82 deaths) (+3)
  • Buffalo - 191 cases (+6) (2 deaths)
  • Burnett - 255 cases (+5) (6 deaths) (+2)
  • Calumet - 2,094 cases (+54) (10 deaths)
  • Chippewa - 959 cases (+72) (2 deaths) (+1)
  • Clark – 599 cases (+21) (9 deaths)
  • Columbia – 1,266 cases (+37) (4 deaths)
  • Crawford – 268 cases (+7)
  • Dane – 12,072 cases (+217) (46 deaths)
  • Dodge – 2,806 cases (+73) (19 deaths)
  • Door - 563 cases (+1) (4 deaths)
  • Douglas - 655 cases (+7) (1 death)
  • Dunn - 797 cases (+6) (1 death)
  • Eau Claire - 2,508 cases (+37) (9 deaths)
  • Florence - 149 cases (+6) (4 deaths)
  • Fond du Lac – 3,247 cases (+112) (16 deaths)
  • Forest - 388 cases (+4) (10 deaths) (+1)
  • Grant – 1,538 cases (+59) (23 deaths)
  • Green - 760 cases (+18) (3 deaths)
  • Green Lake - 536 cases (+15) (2 deaths)
  • Iowa - 335 cases (+14) (1 death) (+1)
  • Iron - 158 cases (1 death) (cases revised -1 by state)
  • Jackson - 247 cases (+22) (1 death)
  • Jefferson - 2,112 cases (+62) (9 deaths)
  • Juneau - 566 cases (+11) (3 deaths)
  • Kenosha – 4,194 cases (+54) (69 deaths)
  • Kewaunee - 851 cases (+10) (4 deaths)
  • La Crosse – 3,657 cases (+52) (11 deaths)
  • Lafayette - 436 cases (+7) (1 death) (+1)
  • Langlade - 588 cases (+22) (4 deaths)
  • Lincoln - 484 cases (+22) (4 deaths)
  • Manitowoc – 1,940 cases (+50) (7 deaths)
  • Marathon - 3,016 cases (+117) (31 deaths)
  • Marinette - 1,349 cases (+19) (9 deaths)
  • Marquette - 470 cases (+15) (2 deaths)
  • Menominee - 194 cases (+11)
  • Milwaukee – 34,017 (+485) (554 deaths)
  • Monroe - 853 cases (+40) (3 deaths)
  • Oconto - 1,634 cases (+27) (6 deaths)
  • Oneida - 839 cases (+34) (5 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 7,105 cases (+177) (47 deaths) (+1)
  • Ozaukee - 1,740 cases (+56) (21 deaths)
  • Pepin – 85 cases (+4)
  • Pierce – 559 cases (+11) (7 deaths)
  • Polk – 375 cases (+12) (2 deaths)
  • Portage - 2,065 cases (+61) (15 deaths) (+1)
  • Price - 267 cases (+17)
  • Racine - 5,951 cases (+111) (101 deaths)
  • Richland - 350 cases (+18) (6 deaths)
  • Rock – 3,634 cases (+96) (37 deaths)
  • Rusk - 109 cases (+6) (1 death)
  • Sauk – 1,373 cases (+45) (6 deaths)
  • Sawyer - 304 cases (+11) (1 death)
  • Shawano – 1,773 cases (+53) (8 deaths)
  • Sheboygan - 2,828 cases (+118) (20 deaths)
  • St. Croix - 1,332 cases (+27) (9 deaths)
  • Taylor - 324 cases (+15) (6 deaths)
  • Trempealeau - 821 cases (+5) (2 deaths)
  • Vernon - 401 cases (+7) (3 deaths)
  • Vilas - 388 cases (+21) (3 deaths)
  • Walworth - 2,989 cases (+30) (36 deaths)
  • Washburn – 168 cases (+7) (2 deaths)
  • Washington - 3,561 cases (+89) (40 deaths)
  • Waukesha – 9,723 cases (+191) (100 deaths) (+2)
  • Waupaca – 1,806 cases (+65) (28 deaths) (+1)
  • Waushara - 710 cases (+57) (3 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 6,831 cases (+228) (48 deaths) (+2)
  • Wood - 1,226 cases (+44) (9 deaths) (+1)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula**

  • Alger - 52 cases (cases revised -1 by state
  • Baraga - 51 cases (+2) (3 deaths) (deaths revised -1 by state)
  • Chippewa - 58 cases
  • Delta – 807 cases (+25) (16 deaths) (+1)
  • Dickinson – 375 cases (+26) (5 deaths) (+1)
  • Gogebic - 189 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Houghton – 687 cases (+12) (6 deaths) (+1)
  • Iron – 300 cases (+3) (16 deaths)
  • Keweenaw – 14 cases
  • Luce – 28 cases (+5)
  • Mackinac - 94 cases (+4)
  • Marquette - 552 cases (+86) (12 deaths)
  • Menominee - 501 cases (+8) (3 deaths)
  • Ontonagon – 56 cases (+1)
  • Schoolcraft - 49 cases (+4)

* Viewers have asked us why the state has different numbers than what’s reported on some county health department websites. The DHS reports cases from all health departments within a county’s boundaries, including tribal, municipal and county health departments; county websites may not. Also, public health departments update their data at various times whereas the DHS freezes the numbers it receives by the same time every day to compile the afternoon report.

The DHS reports deaths attributed to COVID-19 or in which COVID-19 contributed to their death. Most of the people severely affected by the coronavirus have underlying illnesses or conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease or obesity, which raises a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19 but would’ve lived longer if not for their infection. The state may revise case and death numbers after further review, such as the victim’s residence, duplicated records, or a correction in lab results. Details can be found on the DHS website and Frequently Asked Questions.

**The state of Michigan updates numbers Monday-Saturday.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

Health experts say face masks are still the most effective way the general public can slow the spread of the coronavirus, but only if the masks are worn appropriately -- over the nose and chin. County and state health officials are reminding and urging people to stay home when they feel sick, avoid large gatherings, and distance yourself six feet from people who aren’t from your household.

To help people understand how their decisions affect their own health and others, the Department of Health Services has a decision tool at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/decision.htm. The tool describes how choices matter and offers suggestions to make activities safer.

Copyright 2020 WBAY. All rights reserved.

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