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Wisconsin shatters one-day record: 2,533 new cases, 7 deaths

19.38% of tests were positive
Coronavirus generic
Coronavirus generic(WRDW)
Published: Sep. 18, 2020 at 2:10 PM CDT|Updated: Sep. 18, 2020 at 3:04 PM CDT
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MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) - Wisconsin’s one-day record, the first time Wisconsin had more than 2,000 new coronavirus cases, was shattered the next day. The state reported 2,533 new coronavirus cases Friday. New cases were identified in 70 of Wisconsin’s 72 counties.

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) received 13,067 test results -- the most in one day since August 11 -- with 19.38% coming back positive. That’s the highest positive rate for a day with more than 10,000 test results (Thursday held the previous record, 17.77%).

The state added more than 10,000 cases in a record-setting 6 days.

As you’d expect, the averages went up, too, and set new records also. Wisconsin is averaging 1,576 cases a day over the past 7 days. Right now there is no flattening, just curve. The DHS is urging people to take precautions that are well-publicized: Wear a face mask, avoid groups, keep six feet between you and people who aren’t from your household, wash your hands often, stay home if you have symptoms.

At the current rate, Wisconsin will cross the milestone of 100,000 coronvirus cases early next week. Testing has so far confirmed 97,279 coronavirus cases since February 5.

The DHS says 12,839 people are active cases, or 13.2% of the all-time cases, a full percentage point higher than Thursday’s 12.2%. There are 83,184 patients who are considered recovered.

The state reported 7 more deaths, bringing COVID-19′s death toll to 1,238. That’s 1.27% of known cases, which is a new low. Deaths were reported in Outagamie (2), Winnebago, Burnett, Milwaukee (2) and St. Croix counties. Digging into state statistics, one of the patients was in their 30s, one in their 40s, three were in their 70s and two in their 80s (updated from an earlier version of this report).

[CLICK HERE to find a community testing site]

Forty-seven more COVID-19 patients were hospitalized in the past 24 hours. The latest numbers available are from Thursday, showing 347 COVID-19 patients were in hospitals with 103 in intensive care.

The sharp increase in cases and steady decline in the death toll can be attributed to better treatments but mostly due to more cases being found among young adults, an age group that’s less likely to suffer the serious effects of the coronavirus that require hospitalization -- in fact, may show no symptoms but can still spread the virus.

Age groupCases (% of 97,279)Since ThursdayDeaths (% of 1,238)
0-93,095 (3%)+770 (0%)
10-1912,091 (12%)+5190 (0%)
20-2925,098 (26%)+7349 (1%)
30-3915,013 (15%)+31016 (1%)
40-4912,943 (13%)+27337 (3%)
50-5913,160 (14%)+32784 (7%)
60-698,495 (9%)+203204 (16%)
70-794,414 (5%)+98317 (26%)
80-892,166 (2%)+33353 (29%)
90+804 (1%)+9218 (18%)

Source: Wisconsin Department of Health Services

The DHS only counts a person once, no matter how many times they are tested.

At the time of this writing Friday, there were more than 198,000 deaths attributed to COVID-19 in the United States, which is 21% of the world’s 948,058 COVID-19 deaths recorded by Johns Hopkins University. For comparison, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates anywhere from 24,000 to 62,000 influenza-related deaths in the U.S. during the last flu season, from October 2019 to April 2020 (some states don’t track the flu or report flu-related deaths, which is why the estimate is so varied). Worldwide there are a reported 30.3 million coronavirus cases, with 6.7 million of those in the U.S.

To help people understand how their decisions affect their own health and others, the Department of Health Services introduced a decision tool at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/decision.htm. Going beyond reiterating best practices like social distancing and wearing masks, the tool describes how choices matter and offers suggestions to make activities safer.

County case numbers (counties with new cases or deaths are in bold) are as reported by the DHS. State numbers can vary from county health department numbers, which are updated at different times:

Wisconsin

  • Adams - 183 cases (+2) (3 deaths)
  • Ashland - 49 cases (+1) (2 deaths)
  • Barron - 407 cases (+2) (4 deaths)
  • Bayfield - 76 cases (+3) (1 death)
  • Brown - 7,183 cases (+170) (59 deaths)
  • Buffalo - 119 cases (+2) (2 deaths)
  • Burnett - 101 cases (+4) (3 deaths) (+1)
  • Calumet - 819 cases (+50) (2 deaths)
  • Chippewa - 456 cases (+9)
  • Clark – 313 cases (+6) (8 deaths)
  • Columbia - 478 cases (+7) (2 deaths)
  • Crawford – 135 cases (+2)
  • Dane – 8,455 cases (+213) (41 deaths)
  • Dodge – 1,538 cases (+26) (9 deaths)
  • Door - 220 cases (+11) (3 deaths)
  • Douglas - 359 cases (+8)
  • Dunn - 319 cases (+30)
  • Eau Claire - 1,476 cases (+78) (6 deaths)
  • Florence - 53 cases (+1)
  • Fond du Lac - 1,655 cases (+73) (12 deaths)
  • Forest - 195 cases (+11) (4 deaths)
  • Grant - 703 cases (+30) (19 deaths)
  • Green - 395 cases (+11) (2 deaths)
  • Green Lake - 169 cases (+15)
  • Iowa - 142 cases (+4)
  • Iron - 136 cases (1 death)
  • Jackson - 99 cases (+3) (1 death)
  • Jefferson - 1,166 cases (+33) (7 deaths)
  • Juneau - 302 cases (+9) (1 death)
  • Kenosha - 3,216 cases (+10) (65 deaths)
  • Kewaunee - 350 cases (+32) (2 deaths)
  • La Crosse - 2,375 cases (+254) (2 deaths)
  • Lafayette - 204 cases (+4)
  • Langlade - 120 cases (+2) (2 deaths)
  • Lincoln - 127 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Manitowoc - 806 cases (+37) (2 deaths)
  • Marathon - 976 cases (+24) (14 deaths)
  • Marinette - 707 cases (+12) (7 deaths)
  • Marquette - 169 cases (+5) (1 death)
  • Menominee - 42 cases (+2) (0 deaths)
  • Milwaukee – 26,402 (+274) (521 deaths) (+2)
  • Monroe - 361 cases (+11) (2 deaths)
  • Oconto - 623 cases (+15) (4 deaths)
  • Oneida - 312 cases (+14) (2 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 3,277 cases (+160) (27 deaths) (+2)
  • Ozaukee - 1,173 cases (+22) (19 deaths)
  • Pepin - 54 cases (+1)
  • Pierce - 364 cases (+6) (6 deaths)
  • Polk – 214 cases (2 deaths)
  • Portage - 1,086 cases (+48) (3 deaths)
  • Price - 43 cases (+2)
  • Racine - 4,377 cases (+29) (94 deaths)
  • Richland - 85 cases (+5) (4 deaths)
  • Rock – 2,162 cases (+26) (32 deaths)
  • Rusk - 46 cases (+5) (1 death)
  • Sauk - 777 cases (+19) (3 deaths)
  • Sawyer - 192 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Shawano – 470 cases (+30) (1 death)
  • Sheboygan - 1,415 cases (+98) (14 deaths)
  • St. Croix - 773 cases (+13) (8 deaths) (+1)
  • Taylor - 144 cases (+1) (3 deaths)
  • Trempealeau - 512 cases (+13) (2 deaths)
  • Vernon - 164 cases (+8)
  • Vilas - 157 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Walworth - 2,374 cases (+42) (34 deaths)
  • Washburn – 87 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Washington - 2,156 cases (+48) (32 deaths)
  • Waukesha - 6,452 cases (+165) (85 deaths)
  • Waupaca - 864 cases (+23) (20 deaths)
  • Waushara - 258 cases (+10) (2 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 2,459 cases (+207) (23 deaths) (+1)
  • Wood - 653 cases (+26) (3 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula*

  • Alger - 16 cases
  • Baraga - 8 cases
  • Chippewa - 50 cases (+6)
  • Delta – 217 cases (+2) (5 deaths)
  • Dickinson – 90 cases (+4) (2 deaths)
  • Gogebic - 141 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Houghton – 227 cases (+23) (1 death)
  • Iron – 58 cases (+3) (1 death)
  • Keweenaw - 6 cases (revised -1 by state)
  • Luce – 19 cases (+7)
  • Mackinac - 38 cases (+1)
  • Marquette - 258 cases (+10) (12 deaths)
  • Menominee - 258 cases (+4) (1 death)
  • Ontonagon – 41 cases (+1)
  • Schoolcraft - 19 cases

*The State of Michigan says it will only report county case numbers Monday-Saturday. Health officials there say weekend data are often erratic and generally lower than other days due to reduced testing and lab staffing.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol

Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

Copyright 2020 WBAY. All rights reserved.

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