Advertisement

More than 1,300 new coronavirus cases, 10 more deaths

The state is averaging more than 1,200 cases a day over the past 7 days
Coronavirus generic
Coronavirus generic(WRDW)
Published: Sep. 15, 2020 at 2:03 PM CDT|Updated: Sep. 15, 2020 at 2:50 PM CDT
Email this link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) - Ten more deaths were reported by the state Tuesday as the number of new coronavirus cases in Wisconsin jumped again. This, after dipping below 1,000 Monday. New cases were identified in 65 counties.

The Department of Health Services received 12,266 tests -- three times more tests than Monday -- and reported 1,348 new cases. The positive tests were 10.99% of all the results.

That percentage is down sharply from the past two days, in part due to getting more tests. The 7-day average is 14.81% of tests coming back positive. The 14-day average is a little better at 13.35%, but that’s far above the 5% health experts want to see for managing the spread of the coronavirus. Wisconsin hasn’t been that low since August 12.

The state tally is now 91,304 coronavirus cases since early February. There are currently 10,509 active cases, or 11.5% of all cases -- another increase.

A chart on the DHS website shows cases per capita are skyrocketing among 18- to 24-year-olds starting in mid-August when cases are declining among every other age group except 65+, which shows a very slight increase. People in their 20s now account for 26% of all confirmed coronavirus cases in the state, followed distantly by people in their 30s accounting for 16% of cases. People over 70 still make up the lion’s share of COVID-19 hospitalizations and deaths.

The state says 79,557 people are considered recovered, while 1,220 have died. Menominee County in Wisconsin reported its first COVID-19 death. There were also deaths in Milwaukee (3), Racine, Rock (3), Sheboygan and Walworth counties. As we reported Monday, the death rate fell to 1.3% of known cases. [Corrects our earlier report including Dane County.]

Since yesterday, an additional 56 people were hospitalized for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. To date, 6,406 COVID-19 patients have spent time in hospitals, or 7% of all cases.

Wisconsin is averaging 1,261 new cases a day looking over the past 7 days. The 14-day average is a little better at 1,051, but it marks the second day in a row that extended look back has been over 1,000.

Tally of confirmed casesDate reachedDuration
91,304September 1510 days
80,300September 514 days
70,009August 2213 days
60,554August 912 days
50,179July 2811 days
40,507July 1714 days
30,317July 328 days
20,249June 526 days
10,219May 1095 days
1February 5--

The Wisconsin Hospital Association reports as of Monday there were 341 COVID-19 patients hospitalized, with 98 of them in ICU.

The state reports 24% of licensed medical beds are available -- within the range of 21% to 25% we’ve seen almost every day for weeks. More specifically, the state’s 133 hospitals currently have a total 460 ICU beds (31% of all ICU beds) and 1,419 medical-surgical beds (20% of all medical-surgical beds) available.

So far there are more than 195,000 deaths attributed to COVID-19 in the United States, which is 21% of the world’s 930,311 COVID-19 deaths.

For comparison, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates anywhere from 24,000 to 62,000 influenza-related deaths in the U.S. during the last flu season, from October 2019 to April 2020 (some states don’t track the flu or report flu-related deaths, which is why the estimate is so varied).

[CLICK HERE to find a community testing site]

To help people understand how their decisions affect their own health and others, the Department of Health Services introduced a decision tool at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/decision.htm. Going beyond reiterating best practices like social distancing and wearing masks, the tool describes how choices matter and offers suggestions to make activities safer.

County case numbers (counties with new cases or deaths are in bold) are as reported by the DHS. State numbers can vary from county health department numbers, which are updated at different times:

Wisconsin

  • Adams - 170 cases (+7) (3 deaths)
  • Ashland - 43 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Barron - 401 cases (+3) (4 deaths)
  • Bayfield - 69 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Brown - 6,657 cases (+167) (58 deaths)
  • Buffalo - 111 cases (+4) (2 deaths)
  • Burnett - 85 cases (+8) (2 deaths)
  • Calumet - 713 cases (+13) (2 deaths)
  • Chippewa - 423 cases (+3)
  • Clark – 297 cases (+7) (8 deaths)
  • Columbia - 447 cases (+11) (2 deaths)
  • Crawford – 130 cases (+1)
  • Dane – 7,896 cases (+50)
  • Dodge – 1,459 cases (+42) (8 deaths)
  • Door - 192 cases (+5) (3 deaths)
  • Douglas - 336 cases (+2)
  • Dunn - 259 cases (+5)
  • Eau Claire - 1,286 cases (+27) (6 deaths)
  • Florence - 49 cases (+3)
  • Fond du Lac - 1,490 cases (+23) (12 deaths)
  • Forest - 167 cases (+9) (4 deaths)
  • Grant - 624 cases (+21) (19 deaths)
  • Green - 362 cases (+4) (2 deaths)
  • Green Lake - 146 cases (+6)
  • Iowa - 134 cases (cases revised -1 by state)
  • Iron - 136 cases (1 death)
  • Jackson - 94 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Jefferson - 1,097 cases (+25) (7 deaths)
  • Juneau - 278 cases (+5) (1 death)
  • Kenosha - 3,166 cases (+16) (65 deaths)
  • Kewaunee - 277 cases (+10) (2 deaths)
  • La Crosse - 1,889 cases (+90) (2 deaths)
  • Lafayette - 198 cases (+1)
  • Langlade - 112 cases (+11) (2 deaths)
  • Lincoln - 115 cases (+4) (1 death)
  • Manitowoc - 734 cases (+23) (2 deaths)
  • Marathon - 905 cases (+13) (14 deaths)
  • Marinette - 673 cases (+3) (7 deaths)
  • Marquette - 147 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Menominee - 34 cases (+2) (1 death) (+1)
  • Milwaukee – 25,721 (+94) (517 deaths) (+3)
  • Monroe - 330 cases (+11) (2 deaths)
  • Oconto - 575 cases (+16) (4 deaths)
  • Oneida - 286 cases (+4) (2 deaths)
  • Outagamie – 2,888 cases (+97) (24 deaths)
  • Ozaukee - 1,112 cases (+19) (18 deaths)
  • Pepin - 51 cases (cases revised -1 by state)
  • Pierce - 341 cases (+8) (6 deaths)
  • Polk – 212 cases (+7) (2 deaths)
  • Portage - 974 cases (+25) (3 deaths)
  • Price - 39 cases (+1)
  • Racine - 4,299 cases (+38) (94 deaths) (+1)
  • Richland - 74 cases (+1) (4 deaths)
  • Rock – 2,063 cases (+15) (32 deaths) (+3)
  • Rusk - 39 cases (1 death) (cases revised -1 by state)
  • Sauk - 730 cases (+6) (3 deaths)
  • Sawyer - 185 cases (1 death)
  • Shawano – 407 cases (+8)
  • Sheboygan - 1,277 cases (+34) (12 deaths) (+1)
  • St. Croix - 733 cases (+8) (7 deaths)
  • Taylor - 137 cases (+5) (3 deaths)
  • Trempealeau - 476 cases (+2) (2 deaths)
  • Vernon - 144 cases (cases revised -1 by state)
  • Vilas - 148 cases (+3) (1 death)
  • Walworth - 2,239 cases (+123) (33 deaths) (+1)
  • Washburn – 83 cases (1 death)
  • Washington - 2,016 cases (+43) (32 deaths)
  • Waukesha - 6,170 cases (+39) (85 deaths)
  • Waupaca - 821 cases (+6) (19 deaths)
  • Waushara - 243 cases (+5) (2 deaths)
  • Winnebago – 2,100 cases (+81) (22 deaths)
  • Wood - 590 cases (+11) (3 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula*

  • Alger - 16 cases
  • Baraga - 7 cases
  • Chippewa - 44 cases
  • Delta – 198 cases (+6) (4 deaths)
  • Dickinson – 76 cases (+2) (2 deaths)
  • Gogebic - 140 cases (1 death)
  • Houghton – 183 cases (+5) (1 death)
  • Iron – 49 cases (1 death)
  • Keweenaw - 6 cases
  • Luce – 11 cases
  • Mackinac - 36 cases
  • Marquette - 243 cases (+2) (11 deaths)
  • Menominee - 241 cases (+4)
  • Ontonagon – 38 cases (+2)
  • Schoolcraft - 18 cases (+2)

*The State of Michigan says it will only report county case numbers Monday-Saturday. Health officials there say weekend data are often erratic and generally lower than other days due to reduced testing and lab staffing.

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol

Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

Copyright 2020 WBAY. All rights reserved.

Latest News

Latest News