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State: 15 new deaths reported, 946 people test positive for COVID-19

COVID-19 case numbers on the rise
COVID-19 case numbers on the rise(test)
Published: Sep. 5, 2020 at 2:16 PM CDT
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MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) – A day after a record amount of newly confirmed COVID-19 cases was announced by the Wisconsin health officials, another 946 new cases on Saturday out of 8,021 total tests.

Saturday’s report brings the statewide total of COVID-19 cases to 80,300 since testing began in February.

Out of the new test results released, another 7,075 people tested negative, bringing the current total of negative tests to 1,217,278.

The number of positive tests on Saturday made up 11.8% of all new test results.

57 out of Wisconsin’s 72 counties reported an increase of cases on Saturday. In Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, there were no new cases or deaths reported.

Health officials say the percentage of active cases dropped slightly Saturday from 10% to 9.9%, a total of 7,961 people. The number of recovered cases is 71,153, or 88.6%, a slight increase from Friday’s report of 88.5%.

According to the state, the death toll still accounts for 1.5% of known cases, despite the state adding another 15 deaths on Saturday. Health officials report 1,168 people have died from COVID-19. Dodge, Marinette, Oconto, Oneida, Rock, Waukesha and Waupaca Counties each reported one new death, while Fond du Lac County reported two new deaths and Milwaukee County reported six new deaths.

More than 6,000 people (6,048) have been hospitalized for treatment of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, which is an increase of 50 people, according to the DHS. That’s 7.5% of all cases, a slight decrease from Friday’s report (7.6%).

According to the state, there are currently 302 COVID-19 patients in hospitals. Of these, 116 are in ICU. Those numbers are unchanged since Friday.

Another 130 patients have COVID-19 test results pending.

Friday’s numbers were higher due to an issue with laboratory testing, according to the DHS, although that didn’t explain the higher percentage of positive results without knowing if the tests that were delayed came from somewhere people were known to be ill, such as hospitals.

“That came from the DHS directly: The laboratories that they were using just got backed up. Happens from time to time. So, the numbers are going to look a little inflated today,” Brown County Public Health Strategist Claire Paprocki said on Friday.

[CLICK HERE to find a community testing site]

Within the past week, we’ve seen local and county health departments in Northeast Wisconsin, including Oconto County and Fox Valley counties, issue a “call to action” urging people to avoid large gatherings on this holiday weekend, whether it’s a neighborhood picnic or going to the beach or park. The concerns about Labor Day activities aren’t just in Wisconsin, they extend nationwide (see related story).

Gov. Tony Evers and the DHS issued a statement late Friday afternoon saying 20% of confirmed coronavirus cases are linked to group gatherings.

“Contact tracing data suggests that fewer people are staying home with 20% of total confirmed cases reporting attending a gathering, party, or meeting up with people outside their homes within two weeks prior to testing positive for COVID-19. This percentage is even higher among younger adults, and it shows an increase from June, when this number was 14%, and May, when it was 7%,” the statement reads.

To help people understand how their decisions affect their own health and others, the Department of Health Services introduced a decision tool at https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/covid-19/decision.htm. Going beyond reiterating best practices like social distancing and wearing masks, the tool describes how choices matter and offers suggestions to make activities safer.

County case numbers (counties with new cases or deaths are in bold) are as reported by the DHS. State numbers can vary from county health department numbers, which are updated at different times:

Wisconsin

  • Adams - 139 cases (+5) (3 deaths)
  • Ashland - 37 cases (1 death)
  • Barron - 385 cases (+3) (3 deaths)
  • Bayfield - 52 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Brown - 5,787 cases (+98) (58 deaths)
  • Buffalo - 89 cases (+5) (2 deaths)
  • Burnett - 48 cases (+3) (2 deaths)
  • Calumet - 574 cases (+20) (2 deaths)
  • Chippewa - 376 cases (+4)
  • Clark – 257 cases (8 deaths)
  • Columbia - 377 cases (+5) (2 deaths)
  • Crawford – 118 cases (+5)
  • Dane – 5,961 cases (+162) (40 deaths)
  • Dodge – 1,249 cases (+16) (6 deaths) (+1)
  • Door - 144 cases (+1) (3 deaths)
  • Douglas - 280 cases (+10)
  • Dunn - 189 cases (+2)
  • Eau Claire - 905 cases (+23) (6 deaths)
  • Florence - 30 cases (Decrease from 32 in Friday’s DHS report)
  • Fond du Lac - 1,241 cases (+16) (12 deaths) (+2)
  • Forest - 103 cases (+9) (4 deaths)
  • Grant - 461 cases (+18) (18 deaths)
  • Green - 282 cases (+4) (2 deaths)
  • Green Lake - 104 cases (+3)
  • Iowa - 123 cases
  • Iron - 130 cases (1 death)
  • Jackson - 77 cases (1 death)
  • Jefferson - 979 cases (+16) (7 deaths)
  • Juneau - 248 cases (1 death)
  • Kenosha - 3,039 cases (+15) (65 deaths)
  • Kewaunee - 205 cases (+3) (2 deaths)
  • La Crosse - 1,312 cases (+26) (2 deaths)
  • Lafayette - 186 cases
  • Langlade - 84 cases (2 deaths)
  • Lincoln - 88 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Manitowoc - 590 cases (+20) (2 deaths)
  • Marathon - 810 cases (+6) (14 deaths)
  • Marinette - 631 cases (+4) (7 deaths) (+1)
  • Marquette - 101 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Menominee - 29 cases
  • Milwaukee – 24,706 (+105) (502 deaths) (+6)
  • Monroe - 302 cases (+4) (2 deaths)
  • Oconto - 471 cases (+16) (3 deaths) (+1)
  • Oneida - 222 cases (1 death) (+1)
  • Outagamie – 2,209 cases (+72) (21 deaths)
  • Ozaukee - 988 cases (+14) (18 deaths)
  • Pepin - 48 cases
  • Pierce - 302 cases (+6) (6 deaths)
  • Polk - 183 cases (+4) (2 deaths)
  • Portage - 699 cases (+13) (2 deaths)
  • Price - 36 cases
  • Racine - 4,147 cases (+18) (91 deaths)
  • Richland - 61 cases (+5) (4 deaths)
  • Rock - 1,786 cases (+23) (28 deaths) (+1)
  • Rusk - 29 cases (+5) (1 death)
  • Sauk - 678 cases (+5) (3 deaths)
  • Sawyer - 165 cases
  • Shawano – 308 cases (+1)
  • Sheboygan - 1,153 cases (+12) (9 deaths)
  • St. Croix - 670 cases (+5) (7 deaths)
  • Taylor - 119 cases (+2) (3 deaths)
  • Trempealeau - 441 cases (+4) (2 deaths)
  • Vernon - 115 cases
  • Vilas - 124 cases
  • Walworth - 1,790 cases (+25) (32 deaths)
  • Washburn – 71 cases
  • Washington - 1,762 cases (+25) (29 deaths)
  • Waukesha - 5,788 cases (+34) (78 deaths) (+1)
  • Waupaca - 750 cases (+16) (19 deaths) (+1)
  • Waushara - 181 cases (+2) (2 deaths)
  • Winnebago - 1,663 cases (+18) (21 deaths)
  • Wood - 516 cases (+10) (3 deaths)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula

  • Alger - 17 cases
  • Baraga - 6 cases
  • Chippewa - 43 cases
  • Delta – 150 cases (3 deaths)
  • Dickinson – 66 cases (2 deaths)
  • Gogebic - 135 cases (1 death)
  • Houghton – 96 cases (2 deaths)
  • Iron – 34 cases (1 death)
  • Keweenaw - 4 cases
  • Luce – 6 cases
  • Mackinac - 32 cases
  • Marquette - 224 cases (11 deaths)
  • Menominee - 229 cases
  • Ontonagon – 35 cases
  • Schoolcraft - 14 cases

Symptoms

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid groups, gatherings, play dates and nonessential appointments
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care
  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a mask. At a minimum, use a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

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