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Wisconsin adds almost 600 new coronavirus cases, most since July 4

The percentage of positive tests rose again, to 5.57%
Coronavirus
Coronavirus(Associated Press)
Published: Jul. 8, 2020 at 2:14 PM CDT
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MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) - The much-watched percentage of positive results in coronavirus testing rose again Wednesday, back to levels seen a week or two ago. Out of 10,736 results received by the Wisconsin Department of Health Services, 5.57% were positive, or 598 tests. That’s the most since July 4, when the state had 738 positive tests.

Wisconsin has added 10,000 cases and almost 100 deaths in 22 days.

The death toll rose by two, to 807, but there were actually three deaths reported to the state -- one each in Washington and Waupaca counties and the first COVID-19 death in Langlade County. Milwaukee County’s COVID-19 deaths were revised down by one after further review.

The death rate declined one-tenth of a percent to 2.4% of known cases.

Fifty-nine of Wisconsin’s 72 counties saw more positive tests or deaths since Tuesday’s report.

A total 611,150 people have tested negative for the coronavirus. The DHS summary data only counts a person once, even if they’ve had multiple tests.

The number of COVID-19 patients in hospitals and in ICU rose since Tuesday, with 276 currently hospitalized. -- a net increase of 22 since yesterday. Seventy-four of those are in intensive care, 5 more than Tuesday.

A total 3,683 people have been hospitalized for COVID-19 since the coronavirus was first confirmed in Wisconsin in February. That’s 11.1% of known cases, a figure we’ve reported has been declining as the number of younger adults infected -- and are less likely to need hospitalization -- has been rising.

Twenty-one percent of hospital beds across the state are available, unchanged from yesterday but fewer beds than previous weeks as hospitals expand what procedures are available.

The percentage of recovered cases remains at 79%. Eighteen percent of these cases, or 6,037 patients, are still active, meaning it’s been less than 30 days since their diagnosis or the onset of symptoms.

The state has 80 public and private labs available to handle up to 19,014 coronavirus tests each day.

County case numbers (counties in bold indicate an increase in cases or deaths):

Wisconsin

  • Adams - 35 cases (+2) (2 deaths)
  • Ashland - 3 cases
  • Barron - 37 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Bayfield - 4 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Brown - 3,087 cases (+15) (42 deaths)
  • Buffalo - 10 cases (+1) (2 deaths)
  • Burnett - 5 cases (1 death)
  • Calumet - 127 cases (+2) (2 deaths)
  • Chippewa - 124 cases (+6)
  • Clark - 88 cases (+1) (7 deaths)
  • Columbia - 105 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Crawford - 44 cases (+3)
  • Dane – 2,587 cases (+77) (32 deaths)
  • Dodge - 488 cases (+1) (5 deaths)
  • Door - 50 cases (+1) (3 deaths)
  • Douglas - 47 cases (+1)
  • Dunn - 48 cases (+1)
  • Eau Claire - 307 cases (+7) (1 death)
  • Florence - 4 cases
  • Fond du Lac - 347 cases (+8) (6 deaths)
  • Forest - 41 cases (+1) (3 deaths)
  • Grant - 180 cases (+2) (13 deaths)
  • Green - 101 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Green Lake - 41 cases (+1)
  • Iowa - 38 cases
  • Iron - 8 cases (1 death)
  • Jackson - 31 cases (1 death)
  • Jefferson - 303 cases (+11) (4 deaths)
  • Juneau - 44 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Kenosha - 1,628 cases (+18) (44 deaths)
  • Kewaunee - 67 cases (+3) (1 death)
  • La Crosse - 540 cases (+16)
  • Lafayette - 76 cases
  • Langlade - 11 cases (1 death) (+1)
  • Lincoln - 18 cases (+1)
  • Manitowoc - 128 cases (+6) (1 death)
  • Marathon - 233 cases (+7) (1 death)
  • Marinette - 73 cases (+2) (3 deaths)
  • Marquette - 35 cases (+4) (1 death)
  • Menominee - 9 cases (+2)
  • Milwaukee - 12,728 cases (+189) (397 deaths)
  • Monroe - 103 cases (+13) (1 death)
  • Oconto - 69 cases
  • Oneida - 22 cases (+1)
  • Outagamie - 581 cases (+4) (9 deaths)
  • Ozaukee - 275 cases (+2) (15 deaths)
  • Pepin - 2 cases (+1)
  • Pierce - 80 cases (+3)
  • Polk - 63 cases (+1) (2 deaths)
  • Portage - 204 cases (+4)
  • Price - 2 cases
  • Racine - 2,272 cases (+19) (65 deaths)
  • Richland - 15 cases (4 deaths)
  • Rock - 964 cases (+17) (24 deaths)
  • Rusk - 11 cases (1 death) (+1)
  • Sauk - 130 cases (+7) (3 deaths)
  • Sawyer - 14 cases (+1)
  • Shawano - 87 cases (+1)
  • Sheboygan – 255 cases (+10) (4 deaths)
  • St. Croix - 238 cases (+7) (1 death)
  • Taylor - 17 cases (+1)
  • Trempealeau - 158 cases (+18)
  • Vernon - 39 cases (+1)
  • Vilas - 14 cases (+3)
  • Walworth – 713 cases (+12) (18 deaths)
  • Washburn - 5 cases
  • Washington - 451 cases (+8) (17 deaths) (+1)
  • Waukesha - 1,483 cases (+54) (39 deaths)
  • Waupaca - 152 cases (+7) (11 deaths) (+1)
  • Waushara - 36 cases (+2)
  • Winnebago - 726 cases (+3) (13 deaths)
  • Wood - 93 cases (+7) (1 death)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula

  • Alger - 3 cases
  • Baraga - 5 cases
  • Chippewa - 13 cases (+1)
  • Delta - 23 cases (3 deaths)
  • Dickinson - 15 cases (+1) (2 deaths)
  • Gogebic - 10 cases (1 deaths)
  • Houghton - 20 cases (+1)
  • Iron - 6 cases (1 death)
  • Keweenaw - 1 case
  • Luce - 3 cases
  • Mackinac - 9 cases
  • Marquette - 83 cases (+1) (11 deaths)
  • Menominee - 28 cases (+4)
  • Ontonagon - 1 case
  • Schoolcraft - 7 cases (+1)

The state offers an online a tool that displays COVID-19 activity over the past 2 weeks for every county, including the number of cases per 100,000 residents and whether cases are on an upward, even, or downward trend. You can view it by clicking here.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Symptoms that require immediate medical attention include:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to rouse
  • Bluish lips or face
  • The CDC says this is not an all-inclusive list. Consult a medical provider about any symptoms that are severe or concerning.

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid

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