Advertisement

Positive coronavirus tests below 4% for first time in 2 weeks

Steep drop in percentage of positive tests is accompanied by a steep rise in number of tests
Published: Jul. 7, 2020 at 2:03 PM CDT|Updated: Jul. 7, 2020 at 2:36 PM CDT
Email this link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

MADISON, Wis. (WBAY) - Wisconsin continues to have a widespread coronavirus problem, with positive test results coming back in 53 of the state’s 72 counties since Monday afternoon. But the pace of the problem fell sharply on Tuesday when the percentage of positive tests fell below 4% for the first time in 14 days.

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services reported a total 32,556 confirmed cases, an increase of 495 since Monday afternoon. That’s 3.93% of cases. That’s a steep fall from the past three days with percentages of 9.15 to 10.82 percent. It accompanied a steep rise in testing, with 12,594 results received by Tuesday’s cut-off, compared to 4,996 to 6,822 tests over the past three days.

Wisconsin’s two-week trend for the percentage of positive tests is still going in the wrong direction.

The state’s death toll is now 805, or 2.5% of known cases. Nine deaths of COVID-19 patients were reported to the state after three days with no deaths reported.

The percentage of cases hospitalized fell to 11.2%. That may be the result of more positive tests among younger adults, who are less likely to develop COVID-19 or require hospitalization. There have now been 3,639 people hospitalized for COVID-19 treatment altogether, which is 37 more cases than Monday.

There are 254 people currently hospitalized with COVID-19 with 69 of them in intensive care. For hospital readiness, 21% of the hospital beds statewide are still available.

The percentage of recovered cases remains at 79%. Eighteen percent of these cases are still active, meaning it’s been less than 30 days since their diagnosis or the onset of symptoms.

The state has 80 public and private labs available to handle up to 19,014 coronavirus tests each day.

The City of Appleton announced there are two new coronavirus patients in the city, which brings the city’s confirmed case total to 252. Currently, 97 of those patients are in isolation, while 151 others who had COVID-19 have been released from isolation. Four others have died from the virus.

Both of the city’s new patients live in the Outagamie County portion of Appleton.

County case numbers (counties in bold indicate an increase in cases or deaths):

Wisconsin

  • Adams - 33 cases (+1) (2 deaths)
  • Ashland - 3 cases
  • Barron - 36 cases (1 death)
  • Bayfield - 4 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Brown - 3,072 cases (+23) (42 deaths)
  • Buffalo - 9 cases (+1) (2 deaths)
  • Burnett - 5 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Calumet - 125 cases (+6) (2 deaths)
  • Chippewa - 118 cases (+13)
  • Clark - 87 cases (7 deaths)
  • Columbia - 104 cases (1 death)
  • Crawford - 41 cases
  • Dane – 2,510 cases (+53) (32 deaths)
  • Dodge - 487 cases (+3) (5 deaths)
  • Door - 49 cases (+4) (3 deaths)
  • Douglas - 46 cases (+4)
  • Dunn - 47 cases (+1)
  • Eau Claire - 300 cases (+10) (1 death)
  • Florence - 4 cases
  • Fond du Lac - 339 cases (+10) (6 deaths)
  • Forest - 40 cases (+1) (3 deaths)
  • Grant - 178 cases (+1) (13 deaths)
  • Green - 100 cases (1 death)
  • Green Lake - 40 cases
  • Iowa - 38 cases (+1)
  • Iron - 8 cases (1 death)
  • Jackson - 31 cases (+4) (1 death)
  • Jefferson - 292 cases (+1) (4 deaths)
  • Juneau - 43 cases (1 death)
  • Kenosha - 1,610 cases (+18) (44 deaths)
  • Kewaunee - 64 cases (1 death)
  • La Crosse - 524 cases (+5)
  • Lafayette - 76 cases
  • Langlade - 11 cases
  • Lincoln - 17 cases (+2)
  • Manitowoc - 122 cases (+6) (1 death)
  • Marathon - 226 cases (+1) (1 death)
  • Marinette - 71 cases (+3) (3 deaths)
  • Marquette - 31 cases (+7) (1 death)
  • Menominee - 7 cases
  • Milwaukee - 12,539 cases (+143) (398 deaths) (+7)
  • Monroe - 90 cases (+2) (1 death)
  • Oconto - 69 cases (+2)
  • Oneida - 21 cases (+1)
  • Outagamie - 577 cases (+25) (9 deaths)
  • Ozaukee - 273 cases (+10) (15 deaths)
  • Pepin - 1 case
  • Pierce - 77 cases (+1)
  • Polk - 61 cases (+1) (2 deaths)
  • Portage - 200 cases (+4)
  • Price - 2 cases
  • Racine - 2,253 cases (+35) (65 deaths) (+2)
  • Richland - 15 cases (4 deaths)
  • Rock - 947 cases (+7) (24 deaths)
  • Rusk - 11 cases
  • Sauk - 123 cases (3 deaths)
  • Sawyer - 13 cases (+1)
  • Shawano - 86 cases
  • Sheboygan – 245 cases (+9) (4 deaths)
  • St. Croix - 231 cases (+13) (1 death)
  • Taylor - 16 cases (+1)
  • Trempealeau - 140 cases (+3)
  • Vernon - 38 cases
  • Vilas - 14 cases (+3)
  • Walworth – 701 cases (+10) (18 deaths)
  • Washburn - 5 cases (+1)
  • Washington - 443 cases (+7) (16 deaths)
  • Waukesha - 1,429 cases (+17) (39 deaths)
  • Waupaca - 145 cases (+6) (10 deaths)
  • Waushara - 34 cases (+1)
  • Winnebago - 723 cases (+8) (13 deaths)
  • Wood - 86 cases (1 death)

Michigan’s Upper Peninsula

  • Alger - 3 cases
  • Baraga - 5 cases
  • Chippewa - 13 cases (+1)
  • Delta - 23 cases (3 deaths)
  • Dickinson - 14 cases (+1) (2 deaths)
  • Gogebic - 10 cases (1 deaths)
  • Houghton - 19 cases (+1)
  • Iron - 6 cases (1 death)
  • Keweenaw - 1 case
  • Luce - 3 cases
  • Mackinac - 9 cases
  • Marquette - 82 cases (+7) (11 deaths)
  • Menominee - 24 cases (+1)
  • Ontonagon - 1 case
  • Schoolcraft - 6 cases

The state offers an online a tool that displays COVID-19 activity over the past 2 weeks for every county, including the number of cases per 100,000 residents and whether cases are on an upward, even, or downward trend. You can view it by clicking here.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified these as possible symptoms of COVID-19:

  • Fever of 100.4 or higher
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell

Symptoms that require immediate medical attention include:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to rouse
  • Bluish lips or face
  • The CDC says this is not an all-inclusive list. Consult a medical provider about any symptoms that are severe or concerning.

Prevention

  • The coronavirus is a new, or “novel,” virus. Nobody has a natural immunity to it. Children and teens seem to recover best from the virus. Older people and those with underlying health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, lung disease) are considered at high risk, according to the CDC. Precautions are also needed around people with developing or weakened immune systems.
  • To help prevent the spread of the virus:
  • Stay at least six feet away from other people
  • Avoid close contact with people who are or appear sick
  • Stay at home as much as possible
  • Cancel events and avoid

Copyright 2020 WBAY. All rights reserved.

Latest News

Latest News