Anissa Weier found mentally ill in Slender Man stabbing

Courtesy: WISN

WAUKESHA, Wis. (AP) — The Latest on a jury trial to decide whether a Wisconsin girl accused of helping stab a classmate to please horror character Slender Man is mentally competent (all times local):

11 p.m.

A jury has found that a Wisconsin girl who admitted to participating in the 2014 stabbing of a classmate to please horror character Slender Man was mentally ill during the attack.

By a 10-2 decision, jurors said Anissa Weier suffered a mental disease or defect when she participated in stabbing a girl 19 times, and that she was either incapable of knowing it was wrong or unable to conform with the laws.

The ruling means Weier avoids prison. The judge ordered that she be placed in a mental treatment facility.

Weier told investigators she and co-defendant Morgan Geyser believed they had to sacrifice Payton Leutner to protect themselves and their families from Slender Man. Prosecutors argued she knew what she was doing was wrong.

All three girls were 12. The victim survived.

8:50 p.m.

A Waukesha County judge says he's going to give a jury new instructions for their deliberations in the stabbing case against Anissa Weier.

The jury is deciding if the Wisconsin girl was mentally competent when she helped stab a classmate 19 times to please a fictional horror character, Slender Man.

Under Wisconsin law, 10 of 12 jurors must agree on Weier's mental state. They're asked two questions:

Question #1: "At the time the crime was committed, did the defendant have a mental disease or defect?" Question # 2: If yes, "did the defendant lack substantial capacity either to appreciate the wrongfulness of the conduct or to conform that conduct to the requirements of the law?"

After 9½ hours of deliberations, the jury returned a verdict. Judge Michael Bohren did not announce it in court, but Weier attorney Maura McMahon said 10 jurors found Weier mentally ill and 10 found her not responsible.

But Bohren said the same 10 didn't answer each question, so the verdict was inconsistent.

After reviewing case law, the judge determined the verdict was not valid.

If the jury rules Weier couldn't understand the wrongfulness of her actions, she'll go to a mental treatment center. If she did know or was able to conform with the law, she will go to prison.

8:10 p.m.

A jury deciding whether a Wisconsin girl accused of helping stab a classmate to please horror character Slender Man was mentally competent was sent back into deliberations by the judge Friday night after announcing they reached a verdict.

The judge said there was an issue with the verdict but did not explain. Our sister station WISN reports the judge wanted to clarify which jurors cast dissenting votes, and on which questions.

The verdict doesn't have to be unanimous. Ten jurors must agree.

According to investigators, Anissa Weier and Morgan Geyser stabbed Payton Leutner in a suburban Milwaukee park in 2014, nearly killing her. All three were 12 at the time.

Weier and Geyser told detectives they believed they had to kill Leutner to become Slender Man's servants and protect their families from him. Weier's attorneys are trying to convince jurors she was mentally ill during the attack and should be committed to an institution rather than prison.

Jurors began deliberations a little after 10 a.m. and have worked throughout the day. Wisconsin law requires that only 10 of the 12 jurors agree on a verdict in a mental competency case but there were no indications the panel was close to a decision as the clock ticked toward 7 p.m.

___

10:15 a.m.

Prosecutors say a Wisconsin girl accused of helping stab a classmate to appease online horror character Slender Man participated in a cold and calculated attack.

According to investigators, Anissa Weier and Morgan Geyser stabbed Payton Leutner in a suburban Milwaukee park in 2014, nearly killing her. All three were 12 at the time.

Weier and Geyser told detectives they believed they had to kill Leutner to become Slender Man's servants and protect their families from him.

Weier's attorneys are trying to convince jurors she was mentally ill during the attack and should be committed to an institution rather than prison. Waukesha County Deputy District Attorney Ted Szczupakiewicz told the jury during his closing arguments Friday that the girls had planned the attack for months and that they were not in a "kill or be killed situation."

Jurors are now deliberating.

___

9:30 a.m.

An attorney for a girl accused of stabbing a classmate to appease online horror character Slender Man is telling a jury that her mind was "broken" during the attack.

Attorneys for Anissa Weier are trying to convince a jury that she was suffering from a mental illness when she and Morgan Geyser attacked Payton Leutner in a suburban Milwaukee park in 2014. All the girls were 12 at the time. Leutner survived. Weier and Geyser told police they had to kill Leutner so they could become Slender Man's servants and protect their families from him.

In closing arguments Friday, Weier's attorney, Maura McMahon insisted that Weier and Geyser suffered a shared delusion that Slender Man was real. She added that Geyser is schizophrenic and Weier clung to her because she was lonely and depressed.

___

12:15 a.m.

The case of a Wisconsin girl who admitted stabbing a classmate to appease an online horror character called Slender Man will soon go to a jury.

Closing arguments are scheduled Friday for Anissa Weier (ah-NEE'-sah WY'-ur). She argues she was mentally ill and should be sent to a mental institution rather than prison.

Weier and co-defendant Morgan Geyser (GY'-zur) were accused of luring classmate Payton Leutner (LYT'-nur) to a wooded area in a suburban Milwaukee park and then attacking her. All three girls were 12 at the time.

Leutner survived.

Weier's attorneys say she and Geyser shared a delusion about Slender Man that made them fear he could kill their families. Prosecutors have argued Weier, now 15, knew what she was doing was wrong and just wanted to preserve her friendship with Geyser.

(Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)