Debate over concealed carry reciprocity continues in Washington

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WASHINGTON (Gray DC) - A Republican quest for gun reform is underway on Capitol Hill. The efforts center around honoring concealed carry permits in every state. The National Rifle Association says they have been pushing for reciprocity legislation for years and now is the perfect time to get it done. The Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act recently passed through the House. It would force states to recognize concealed carry permits obtained in another state.

Catherine Mortensen says Second Amendment rights should be respected everywhere in the United States.

“If you are a law-abiding citizen in your home state and you have a permit to carry a firearm in your home state, you should be able to travel anywhere in the country and have that recognized,” said Catherine Mortensen, a representative for the NRA.

Mortensen says with a Republican majority across Washington, pro-gun leaders need to take action. She says gun owners should not be subjected to confusing state and local laws. Mortensen says the Second Amendment should not be up for debate.

“The consequence will be that law-abiding gun owners won’t be able to protect and defend themselves as they travel across the country,” said Mortensen.

In the wake of mass shootings in Nevada and Texas, gun control advocates say this is not the reform Congress should be focused on.

“Our leaders in Washington continue to, you know, kowtow to the NRA and the gun lobby leadership,” said Connie Coartney from Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America.

She says as mass shootings continue, the focus should be on strengthening background check systems, not expanding gun owner rights. Coartney says recognizing more easily acquired permits in every state is dangerous.

“That they can’t, you know, put their constituents best interests in mind is a sad state of affairs and I think it’s time for them to step up,” said Coartney.

The Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act is awaiting action in the Senate.

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